ANOTHER WINDSHIELD Bites the Dust - What Number are You On?

Rentaldude

New member
It's a Jeep thing! If you have one, you totally understand that replacing windshields on a regular basis is a way of life. I've literally replaced so many on Moby alone that the guys at my local Fast Glass shop in Carson City know me on a first name basis... seriously! Anyway, I was wanting to know how many windshields you've gone through so far. Also, please let us know what year your Jeep is so that it can put things into perspective. Thanks! :crazyeyes:

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Oh, I should note that Moby's last windshield had several chips and cracks in it but none were bad enough for me to replace it. This last strike is what finally made me take him in to get it replaced. Had the rock hit just a 1/4" higher.... :rolleyes2:

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I'm new to owning Jeep's and have not experienced this yet. Other than flying projectiles how do the break? I'm quessing here is there alot of body twisting that cracks the front windshield?
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
I'm new to owning Jeep's and have not experienced this yet. Other than flying projectiles how do the break? I'm quessing here is there alot of body twisting that cracks the front windshield?
Unlike most vehicles, the windshields on Wranglers and Gladiators are pretty vertical. This causes them to attract more projectiles and so strike breaks are inevitable.
 

Rentaldude

New member
Thank you for your reply. I have a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon JLU. After I installed a Dynatrac 2.0 lift kit and 35" M/T Baja Boss tires the first thing I noticed was steering wondering or maybe "Bump Steer" it's called? Bumps in the road affected the steering as well.
I really like adjustable shocks and the 2.0 Fox shocks from the kit ride nice. But I still wanted the adjustables and installed the new version 2.5 Fox shocks $1600 a pair and the Falcon 2.2 adjustable steering dampener. WOW what a difference the new shocks feel amazing and the increased shock performance seem to have helped the steering combined with the Falcon 2.2 set on Medium. I ordered a Synergy sector steering support brace just to have one in case the wondering is not corrected. I learned that Jeep is replacing the steering gear on 2018-2020 Jeeps with the aluminum body under campaign replacing with a cast steel steer gear. The 2021 models already have the cast steel steering gear. Based on the way my Jeep was driving I don't think the new steel box is the cure all for Jeep. So I'm on hold right now and evauating the steering and handling to see if the 'Bump Steer" has been corrected.
Any thoughts about the steering?
 

BaddestCross

Active Member
Thank you for your reply. I have a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon JLU. After I installed a Dynatrac 2.0 lift kit and 35" M/T Baja Boss tires the first thing I noticed was steering wondering or maybe "Bump Steer" it's called? Bumps in the road affected the steering as well.
I really like adjustable shocks and the 2.0 Fox shocks from the kit ride nice. But I still wanted the adjustables and installed the new version 2.5 Fox shocks $1600 a pair and the Falcon 2.2 adjustable steering dampener. WOW what a difference the new shocks feel amazing and the increased shock performance seem to have helped the steering combined with the Falcon 2.2 set on Medium. I ordered a Synergy sector steering support brace just to have one in case the wondering is not corrected. I learned that Jeep is replacing the steering gear on 2018-2020 Jeeps with the aluminum body under campaign replacing with a cast steel steer gear. The 2021 models already have the cast steel steering gear. Based on the way my Jeep was driving I don't think the new steel box is the cure all for Jeep. So I'm on hold right now and evauating the steering and handling to see if the 'Bump Steer" has been corrected.
Any thoughts about the steering?
Also, check your tire pressure. Sounds like it's probably too high.
 

QuicksilverJK

Caught the Bug
After reading through the comments in here I’m a little embarrassed that my windshield has been broken for probably 3 years now 🙄. It gets worse every year but I can still see past the cracks 😉
 

Rentaldude

New member
Also, check your tire pressure. Sounds like it's probably too high.
That’s a question! My tires are 39psi currently. The jeep default is 37 pounds with the BFG 33 inch C class tire it came with.
The D or E rated tires have a much higher psi requirement. Therefore I am not sure what is a safe psi for these heavier tires?
Any comments would be appreciated
 

Primo82

Caught the Bug
That’s a question! My tires are 39psi currently. The jeep default is 37 pounds with the BFG 33 inch C class tire it came with.
The D or E rated tires have a much higher psi requirement. Therefore I am not sure what is a safe psi for these heavier tires?
Any comments would be appreciated
I'll let someone more knowledgeable chime in with actual recommendations. I don't think the rated PSI makes much of a difference as to what PSI it should run at. I think that's more about vehicle weight. From what I've seen here, most people when they go up in tire size drop PSI to get a comfortable ride (if I remember correctly from similar questions). You may want to try 30psi and see if it rides better. If it does you'll need to reprogram your tire pressure monitors or it'll go off constantly (obviously).
 

BaddestCross

Active Member
That’s a question! My tires are 39psi currently. The jeep default is 37 pounds with the BFG 33 inch C class tire it came with.
The D or E rated tires have a much higher psi requirement. Therefore I am not sure what is a safe psi for these heavier tires?
Any comments would be appreciated
Do a chalk test to be 💯 sure what your Jeep needs. Front and rear will be different.
 

bobfriesenhahn

Caught the Bug
Do a chalk test to be 💯 sure what your Jeep needs. Front and rear will be different.
It seems that the answer can also depend on elevation. Sea level ambient pressure is something like 15 PSI. When we measure tire pressure it is the difference between the pressure inside the tire and the outside. At higher elevation the ambient pressure drops, leading to a higher tire pressure.

While traveling over mountain passes at over 8000 foot elevation on tires filled to factory spec at 600 foot elevation, I can see that the tire pressure has gone up at least another 2 PSI over the normal hot temperature, and the tires are obviously bulged so the contact patch is not correct.

The spec is based on a cold tire so it is difficult to adjust the pressure to solve the problem while traveling (other than guessing).
 

jesse3638

Hooked
I'll let someone more knowledgeable chime in with actual recommendations. I don't think the rated PSI makes much of a difference as to what PSI it should run at. I think that's more about vehicle weight. From what I've seen here, most people when they go up in tire size drop PSI to get a comfortable ride (if I remember correctly from similar questions). You may want to try 30psi and see if it rides better. If it does you'll need to reprogram your tire pressure monitors or it'll go off constantly (obviously).
^^^This^^^

I ran 27psi when I had 35's. This was after chalk testing it. They wore really even for 40k miles and a 5 tire rotation. The lower weight rating will require more PSI due to a softer sidewall. I can tell you 39 PSI is way too much.
 

Trail JK

Caught the Bug
You know, I believe we are on our original one. That could only mean one thing, we don’t wheel nearly enough.
 

Bierpower

Active Member
I bought the jeep used with a crack in the windshield. It's on the passenger side so I'll let it roll until the next hit.
 
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