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Parker "P.T." JK
12-26-2012, 03:34 AM
What is, if any, the difference between a tow strap and a tree saver?

Skirmish
12-26-2012, 04:00 AM
A tree saver is a wide strap that you wrap around a tree trunk before using the tree as a winch point. Most can be used as a tow strap depending on the length.

A 2" tow strap would make a bad tree saver. A 3" or wider x 10' tree saver would make a decent tow strap.

biggy
12-26-2012, 04:01 AM
A tree saver is just much shorter maybe six feet long and it is usually wider so it does not damage the tree. It should be rated as strong as your recovery strap.

Miramontes
12-26-2012, 04:01 AM
What is, if any, the difference between a tow strap and a tree saver?

I have both in my bag but to be honest I have not used them yet. I was a rigger for some time so to me it would make sense that the only difference is that the tow strap is longer. To have some distance from the Jeep you are towing. The tree saver would just need to be long enough to choke around a tree and add a snatch block to be able to pull from a different direction.

Indefatigable
12-26-2012, 05:30 AM
Looks like some incomplete information going on here.

Tree saver

Tow strap

Tug strap

All different in construction and application.

Tree saver is to SAVE THE TREE. Zero stretch. Usually on the short side - 6 to 10' in length. Typically on the wider side 4" or so.

Tow straps have minimal stretch and are designed for just towing a vehicle NOT RECOVERY. I very rarely see these available. 2-3" wide typical.

Tug straps may look identical to tow straps, but they have alot of stretch. These are designed for recovery. The energy of the moving vehicle stretches out the strap and that built up energy pulls out the stuck vehicle. The stretch also takes some of the shock impact out of the recovery. Usually 2-3" wide and 20-30' long.

A strap that stretches and is wrapped around a tree does two things. Firstly, strips the bark off the tree and kills it. Second it stretches and can tighten on the tree and in some cases gets stuck there depending on how it was wrapped.

Hope this helps.

Miramontes
12-26-2012, 05:37 AM
Thanks for the info.

Skirmish
12-26-2012, 06:26 AM
I have an ARB 3"x16' Tree Protector. I've used it on another rig's winch to pull him out from a tree and the bark suffered no damage. It is rated for 26,500 lbs and works just fine as a tow strap. It would be a waste of my money to own separate straps to do what one does well.

wayoflife
12-26-2012, 07:58 AM
What is, if any, the difference between a tow strap and a tree saver?

In a nut shell, the difference is in their purpose. Assuming that you are in fact referring to a standard off road "snatch" strap when using the word "tow", this will typically be a lot longer (about 20'-30' long) than a tree saver (about 10' long) and it'll have elastic properties to it. This is good for helping to pull out a friend who's gotten stuck on the trail. A tree saver is short and designed to be easily wrapped around a tree so that you can use it as an anchor point without doing any harm to the tree.

Chiromancer
01-02-2013, 03:50 AM
Uh oh... In my ignorant knowledge, I believe I got a tow strap to use for recovery... It is 4" wide, 30' long and rated for 10,000 pounds... I knew you needed 1.5x your vehicle weight for use... But I was unaware there might be a better type.

My tow strap is still in its packaging (I didn't get stuck and need to use it) so should I return it and get a real recovery strap before I go out again? Also, besides the Internet, this should be something carried in a 4x4 shop (my strap is from Wally World)

Atch
01-02-2013, 03:53 AM
Uh oh... In my ignorant knowledge, I believe I got a tow strap to use for recovery... It is 4" wide, 30' long and rated for 10,000 pounds... I knew you needed 1.5x your vehicle weight for use... But I was unaware there might be a better type.

My tow strap is still in its packaging (I didn't get stuck and need to use it) so should I return it and get a real recovery strap before I go out again? Also, besides the Internet, this should be something carried in a 4x4 shop (my strap is from Wally World)

No, it sounds as if you have what you need right there

Skirmish
01-02-2013, 04:06 AM
It depends on what you want to do with it. Assuming it has looped ends and no hooks it is usable for pulling a stuck vehicle. To tow on the road you want something shorter. Even on a trail towing with a strap that long could be an issue. A snatch strap or elastic recovery strap is used when a jerk pull is needed like if the vehicle is stuck in the mud and the recovering vehicle needs to get some momentum up to yank the stuck one out.

Snatch straps can get expensive and are usually limited in the number of jerking pulls they are rated for. I carry a 30' x 3" ARB snatch strap rated at 17,500 lbs. I have yet to need it in a jerking pull. (The technique involves leaving slack on the ground in an S shape and building speed before the tension is taken up). I have used it many times to help pull a rig up an obstacle but a tow strap would have done the same thing for half the price. I use my shorter tree saver/ tow strap mostly when the stuck rig doesn't have a good recovery hook or D-ring point to wrap a bumper or other area and winch or to wrap a tree to winch.

We tend to travel in packs on the trail so we have a good selection of straps to choose from depending on the situation. I usually have the only snatch strap but since we rarely see mud they aren't as necessary for us.

wayoflife
01-02-2013, 04:28 AM
Uh oh... In my ignorant knowledge, I believe I got a tow strap to use for recovery... It is 4" wide, 30' long and rated for 10,000 pounds... I knew you needed 1.5x your vehicle weight for use... But I was unaware there might be a better type.

My tow strap is still in its packaging (I didn't get stuck and need to use it) so should I return it and get a real recovery strap before I go out again? Also, besides the Internet, this should be something carried in a 4x4 shop (my strap is from Wally World)


No, it sounds as if you have what you need right there

What Atch said, you'll be fine. For the most part, you shouldn't be yanking anybody out but rather, pulling them out and what you have will do that just fine. A snatch strap will allow you to yank and therefore provide more energy but, doing that is always something I do as a last resort as it can also cause damage or breaks.

Renagade119
01-02-2013, 07:18 PM
Ohhh Id like to get in on this. The first thing I did after getting the jeep is getting a Smittybilt tow strap and 2 shackles. My main purpose for the strap would be pulling guys out who are stuck in the snow, at school. Should I be looking into getting a snatch/recovery/tug strap?

JKAnimal
01-02-2013, 08:03 PM
If you want to go with all 3 ARB sells a nice kit with everything you need for recovery. All 3 straps, 2 shackles, gloves, snatch block and a drape for winch cable that doubles as a safety vest, all in a nice bag to keep everything together. It was about $300 bucks a year ago. The only other thing I carry is a decent size chain. We have a lot of sticky red mud here in TX.

Renagade119
01-02-2013, 08:34 PM
Mmmmm I dont think I need all that. Hahaha Im running a stock TJ right now, Im saving up for some upgrades (Im in grade 12, money is pretty slow) and Im really just wondering if a snatch strap is worth it if I already have a tow strap

wayoflife
01-02-2013, 09:07 PM
Mmmmm I dont think I need all that. Hahaha Im running a stock TJ right now, Im saving up for some upgrades (Im in grade 12, money is pretty slow) and Im really just wondering if a snatch strap is worth it if I already have a tow strap

Depending on the kind of wheeling you do, you'll probably be fine with what you have. :yup:

Skirmish
01-02-2013, 09:10 PM
It depends on what type of pull you are willing to do. If you are hooking up to a stuck vehicle and easing out the slack in the strap before pulling then a tow strap is fine. If you want to be able to build momentum first then jerk the stuck vehicle out you will want a snatch strap. Be aware though that as mentioned this raises the odds of damaging one or both of the vehicles.

While we are on the subject, I would suggest using only quality Made in the USA shackles especially if you are doing a snatch recovery but really for any pull. Chicago, Crosby, CM, there are only a couple others that I would trust to actually stand up to their rating. Some Chinese manufacturers actually stamp USA on their shackles. I wouldn't stand anywhere near a shackle stamped China or one that didn't have a rating stamped on it. If it breaks under load you will have heavy shrapnel flying through the air.

Renagade119
01-02-2013, 09:10 PM
Depending on the kind of wheeling you do, you'll probably be fine with what you have. :yup:

Hahaha what I do, hahahaha its sad but I mostly just tear through fields (WITH permission of course) and pulling out friends who got stuck in snowbanks, etc. I go wheeling out at my uncle acreage, lots of hills. So Im open to advice and opinions, hell, Ill go down to the store and place an order tomorrow :rock:

wayoflife
01-02-2013, 09:14 PM
Hahaha what I do, hahahaha its sad but I mostly just tear through fields (WITH permission of course) and pulling out friends who got stuck in snowbanks, etc. I go wheeling out at my uncle acreage, lots of hills. So Im open to advice and opinions, hell, Ill go down to the store and place an order tomorrow :rock:

LOL!! Cool. Well, if you really just have a tow strap, just try not to yank or jerk on people you're trying to recover. A consistent pull is safest regardless of the situation.

Renagade119
01-02-2013, 09:16 PM
LOL!! Cool. Well, if you really just have a tow strap, just try not to yank or jerk on people you're trying to recover. A consistent pull is safest regardless of the situation.

Awesome, Ill just stick with the tow strap untill I get into mudding and deep snow wheeling. thanks guys!!:standing wave:

4X4PLAY
03-13-2014, 01:39 AM
Looks like some incomplete information going on here.

Tree saver

Tow strap

Tug strap

All different in construction and application.

Tree saver is to SAVE THE TREE. Zero stretch. Usually on the short side - 6 to 10' in length. Typically on the wider side 4" or so.

Tow straps have minimal stretch and are designed for just towing a vehicle NOT RECOVERY. I very rarely see these available. 2-3" wide typical.

Tug straps may look identical to tow straps, but they have alot of stretch. These are designed for recovery. The energy of the moving vehicle stretches out the strap and that built up energy pulls out the stuck vehicle. The stretch also takes some of the shock impact out of the recovery. Usually 2-3" wide and 20-30' long.

A strap that stretches and is wrapped around a tree does two things. Firstly, strips the bark off the tree and kills it. Second it stretches and can tighten on the tree and in some cases gets stuck there depending on how it was wrapped.

Hope this helps.

Kudos to you man!! You are the only one to give a correct answer.

Chiromancer, I hope you haven't opened and used your "tow strap" yet, it is strictly a tow strap and should NOT be used for recovery. Recovery straps have an elasticity factor which allows you to pull another vehicle out gently and properly without the shock that is caused by a strap with no elasticity like a tow strap, (it is the shock or jolt that a vehicle will receive damage from.) A tow strap has about 0 to 2% stretch factor, a "snatch strap" has about 10% stretch factor and even better is a kinetic recovery rope which has a stretch factor of about 30%. The more stretch factor the more gentle and safe the pull will be, it is the kinetic energy stored in a strap that does the work and does it safely.

Here's a great video, [edited] unfortunately he didn't cover tree savers but a tree saver should be like a tow strap with no elasticity. You DON'T want the tree saver to stretch (NEVER use a recovery strap as a tree saver), if there is stretch and the cable breaks that stretch is going to turn something in to a projectile.

Anyone who wheels SHOULD have both a tree saver and a recovery strap (snatch strap).

Happy and SAFE wheeling!
Jeff

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 02:33 AM
Kudos to you man!! You are the only one to give a correct answer.

Chiromancer, I hope you haven't opened and used your "tow strap" yet, it is strictly a tow strap and should NOT be used for recovery. Recovery straps have an elasticity factor which allows you to pull another vehicle out gently and properly without the shock that is caused by a strap with no elasticity like a tow strap, (it is the shock or jolt that a vehicle will receive damage from.) A tow strap has about 0 to 2% stretch factor, a "snatch strap" has about 10% stretch factor and even better is a kinetic recovery rope which has a stretch factor of about 30%. The more stretch factor the more gentle and safe the pull will be, it is the kinetic energy stored in a strap that does the work and does it safely.

Here's a great video, [edited] unfortunately he didn't cover tree savers but a tree saver should be like a tow strap with no elasticity. You DON'T want the tree saver to stretch (NEVER use a recovery strap as a tree saver), if there is stretch and the cable breaks that stretch is going to turn something in to a projectile.

Anyone who wheels SHOULD have both a tree saver and a recovery strap (snatch strap).

Happy and SAFE wheeling!
Jeff

Oh, I get it, you dug up this old crusty thread that was started back in 2012 just so you can make your very first post here pimping the YouTube videos you just made highlighting recovery straps. :naw:

Seriously, do us all a favor and start up your own forum and go pimp there.

4X4PLAY
03-13-2014, 03:06 AM
Oh, I get it, you dug up this old crusty thread that was started back in 2012 just so you can make your very first post here pimping the YouTube videos you just made highlighting recovery straps. :naw:

Seriously, do us all a favor and start up your own forum and go pimp there.

Haha That wasn't the case at all, I was was researching something and came across this thread, I didn't dig it up, I actually mistook the date somehow. I see it now and realize my error, I certainly wouldn't expect buddy to still have his strap unused over a year later.

I wasn't trying to promote a video at all, there was some poor info given and I figured posting a video demonstrating straps would help benefit those that obviously were confused about straps.

My apologies!

Regards,

Jeff

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 03:52 AM
Haha That wasn't the case at all, I was was researching something and came across this thread, I didn't dig it up, I actually mistook the date somehow. I see it now and realize my error, I certainly wouldn't expect buddy to still have his strap unused over a year later.

I wasn't trying to promote a video at all, there was some poor info given and I figured posting a video demonstrating straps would help benefit those that obviously were confused about straps.

My apologies!

Regards,

Jeff

And why exactly do you need to do research for something you're already a self-proclaimed expert on? :thinking: