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PlenaBarba
01-25-2013, 03:24 PM
So its a noob question, but what length lift do you guys go with, 48" or 60"?

I would like to get one soon and I don't like buying twice when possible. Also, Do you prefer all cast or cast and steel?

wayoflife
01-25-2013, 03:35 PM
You only really need a 48" for most applications. When you start to play with 37" - 40" tires, a 60" would be helpful but, you can still get a lot done with a 48". Of course, for the most part, I try not to use a Hi-Lift whenever possible.

MTG
01-25-2013, 04:45 PM
Do not own one wasn't listed, so I'll vote down here. ;)

Pushrod
02-03-2013, 06:53 PM
The 48" is as heavy as I want to carry, but I have never used it and it rattles a lot so I leave it in the shed. If I had it to do over I would spend the money on cracker jacks or something more useful.

Jersey_Devil
02-03-2013, 07:46 PM
I originally bought a 60" all cast for my Ram

14700

Knew I wouldn't need a 60 for a Jeep so instead of buying a new one, I cut the 60 down to 50"


14701

But like mentioned above.... I try not to use it unless absolutely necessary! I just think it looks cool lol:thumb:

Renagade119
02-07-2013, 01:15 AM
You only really need a 48" for most applications. When you start to play with 37" - 40" tires, a 60" would be helpful but, you can still get a lot done with a 48". Of course, for the most part, I try not to use a Hi-Lift whenever possible.

Just out of curiosity, why not? There arent many other options for changing a tire do you?

Jkzinger
02-07-2013, 02:09 AM
Just out of curiosity, why not? There arent many other options for changing a tire do you?

They are not the safest option for jacking up your vehicle! I also try to avoid using it when possible.
:thumb:

Renagade119
02-07-2013, 02:11 AM
They are not the safest option for jacking up your vehicle! I also try to avoid using it when possible.
:thumb:

But Im assuming you use it to change your tire. Im asking so many questions cause I was planning on buying one when I get larger tires, just wanna know what Im getting in to

Skirmish
02-07-2013, 02:46 AM
When you use a bottle, scissor or floor jack to change a tire you are raising the axle enough to get the tire off the ground. With a HiLift you are lifting the body first and need to extend the suspension fully before the tire comes off the ground. The result is a very unstable vehicle. Most jacks will work fine up to 35". There are bases specifically made to give you the couple extra inches to lift your axle with a scissor jack. Keep in mind that 37" tires are only 1" taller under the axle than 35" and only 2.5" taller than stock rubi.

On the trail a HiLift does have many situations that they are very handy in. One of the more common is to raise the frame off a rock in a high center situation so you can place rocks under a tire in a hole.

Renagade119
02-07-2013, 03:16 AM
When you use a bottle, scissor or floor jack to change a tire you are raising the axle enough to get the tire off the ground. With a HiLift you are lifting the body first and need to extend the suspension fully before the tire comes off the ground. The result is a very unstable vehicle. Most jacks will work fine up to 35". There are bases specifically made to give you the couple extra inches to lift your axle with a scissor jack. Keep in mind that 37" tires are only 1" taller under the axle than 35" and only 2.5" taller than stock rubi.

On the trail a HiLift does have many situations that they are very handy in. One of the more common is to raise the frame off a rock in a high center situation so you can place rocks under a tire in a hole.

Ahhhh, thanks for giving me the dumby version. Im just trying to figure everything out. I drive a 06 TJ that has a bottle jack, think itll clear up to 33"?

Skirmish
02-07-2013, 03:27 AM
I would measure it. 33" means you have 16 1/2 " below center. The axle width makes it a little less but you will want some extra for clearance. I would want probably 20" to get a wheel off. Test it on your rig and measure what you can get out of it compared to how much taller the 33" would be. If you are in dirt a shovel can give you more room to put the new tire on.

I don't know the height of a stock JK scissor but flat on the dirt it is enough to do a 35". If there is a dip where it needs to go you might need to build it up under If you don't have a base to raise it a couple short 2x4's will give a decent base. Rocks, some gravel or dirt can build it up enough in a pinch.

If you have to use a HiLift try to keep the vehicle stable. We had one on a winch and still had to push a bumper against side of his bumper to stop it from falling off the jack.

Renagade119
02-07-2013, 03:29 AM
I would measure it. 33" means you have 16 1/2 " below center. The axle width makes it a little less but you will want some extra for clearance. I would want probably 20" to get a wheel off. Test it on your rig and measure what you can get out of it compared to how much taller the 33" would be. If you are in dirt a shovel can give you more room to put the new tire on.

I don't know the height of a stock JK scissor but flat on the dirt it is enough to do a 35". If there is a dip where it needs to go you might need to build it up under If you don't have a base to raise it a couple short 2x4's will give a decent base. Rocks, some gravel or dirt can build it up enough in a pinch.

If you have to use a HiLift try to keep the vehicle stable. We had one on a winch and still had to push a bumper against side of his bumper to stop it from falling off the jack.

Alright, thanks for the info. And yikes, that situation is scary