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TheRoyalDoyle
07-02-2013, 04:56 PM
Just curios what everybody brings when they are on the trail, whether it be for a day or for several nights.
So Far I bring the following:
-Water
-Air
-Sun Screen
-Snacks
-Tow Rope
-First Aid Kit

Will be adding a ton to the list just incase I get stranded out there.

Tranquillity
07-02-2013, 05:25 PM
Planing going alone ? And what kind of trip?

Spare parts, oils, gas, tools. A winch would be mostly essential depending of the terrain you'll be in.

TheRoyalDoyle
07-02-2013, 05:29 PM
Planing going alone ? And what kind of trip?

Spare parts, oils, gas, tools. A winch would be mostly essential depending of the terrain you'll be in.

No more just curios. I would think it would be a good idea to also have fire starting materials and water purification. Just wanted to see what other people loaded up with.

bl17z90
07-02-2013, 05:29 PM
The trusty roll of toilet paper, never leave home without it :doh:

Moochie
07-02-2013, 05:36 PM
Just curios what everybody brings when they are on the trail, whether it be for a day or for several nights.
So Far I bring the following:
-Water
-Air
-Sun Screen
-Snacks
-Tow Rope
-First Aid Kit

Will be adding a ton to the list just incase I get stranded out there.

Here's a link to another thread that has some good info on what to bring with you.
http://wayalife.com/showthread.php?8879-Outfitting-the-jku-for-camping-what-s-needed

Tranquillity
07-02-2013, 05:37 PM
The trusty roll of toilet paper, never leave home without it :doh:

lolll, so true



I guess something like "spot" (gps tracker) would be a good idea if your planing going far from civilisation :)

NFRs2000NYC
07-03-2013, 02:31 AM
A bottle of bleach (purify water.)
Water purification tablets
UV water purifier
Bottled water, but NEVER rely on that as being your water source. Be prepared to run out.
Hopefully you were smart enough to tell someone your intended route and when you are going to return.
Massive calorie protein bars
Jerky
Baby wipes
A few knives
A hatchet
Paracord
A first aid kit
Antibiotic cream
Pain killers
A bunch of lighters and a flint stick
Tow strap
Tree saver x2
6 D rings
Winch
Spare fuses.
On Board Air
8 gallons of extra gas
100 hour candle
Emergency blankets (10 pack)
Fire extinguisher


A lot depends on where Im going to be and what time of year.


Lots of other things like tools, etc, but those are the basics.

Ldogg
07-03-2013, 05:35 AM
I prefer a firesteel with some cotton balls dipped in petroleum jelly or steel wool instead of matches or a lighter.
http://firesteel.com/ has some really nice ones. I have their deluxe armageddon firesteel tube, and a couple smaller key ring ones, and they work in all weather, Even wet. The deluxe one has a compartment for a couple cotton balls and a compass, plus 550 paracord wrapped around it.

MobyJR
07-03-2013, 05:56 AM
A bottle of bleach (purify water.)
Water purification tablets
UV water purifier
Bottled water, but NEVER rely on that as being your water source. Be prepared to run out.
Hopefully you were smart enough to tell someone your intended route and when you are going to return.
Massive calorie protein bars
Jerky
Baby wipes
A few knives
A hatchet
Paracord
A first aid kit
Antibiotic cream
Pain killers
A bunch of lighters and a flint stick
Tow strap
Tree saver x2
6 D rings
Winch
Spare fuses.
On Board Air
8 gallons of extra gas
100 hour candle
Emergency blankets (10 pack)
Fire extinguisher


A lot depends on where Im going to be and what time of year.


Lots of other things like tools, etc, but those are the basics.

Way to go! I never thought about fuses that's a good idea.

bl17z90
07-03-2013, 10:10 AM
On the water topic. Aev's rear bumper actually has a 5 gallon tank for water. Or if you want to be a little cheaper theres a guy who used the stock jk bumper to store water, I'll have to look it up later.

NFRs2000NYC
07-03-2013, 01:08 PM
On the water topic. Aev's rear bumper actually has a 5 gallon tank for water. Or if you want to be a little cheaper theres a guy who used the stock jk bumper to store water, I'll have to look it up later.

Good point, and it is a good design, however it is good practice to NEVER rely on the water you have to last. It's always best to assume the worst, and have a backup plan. Bleach is my plan C. In case of dire emergency, you can add a little bit to a bottle filled with questionable water, shake it up, wait a few minutes, and you're good to go. It might taste like crap (dirt+bleach) but it will keep you alive. It is also low tech, and low tech things make for EXCELLENT plan C's.

Plan Bs I like high tech, and this is an excellent device...
http://www.steripen.com/traveler/

Reasonable cost, and easy to use.

Plan A would be a cocktail at the Four Seasons. ;)

mtnbiker995
07-03-2013, 03:52 PM
Zip ties! They always come in useful for something haha


Sent from my iPhone using WAYALIFE mobile app

UpsideUp
07-03-2013, 04:14 PM
In addition to all mentioned I would bring a backpack with smaller versions of most mentioned. As survival is a hobbies of mine I never leave home without a pack loaded with these essential items.
Warm clothes -lite weight socks, underwear, sweater, and hat
Purifying water straw- there are a few cheap effective ones out there
Backpackers stove and fuel
Map of the area
compass- learn to use it first before needing it for you life
Strong hiking shoes

As mentioned previously
Two ways to make fire
Cliff or power bars
A very sturdy belt knife
Multitool
Babywipes
Fishing kit
First aid
Emergency blanket
Parachord
A flask of vodka- for sterilization and moral boosting
Flashlite and headlamp with spare batteries

You never know if you might have to walk out so that would be a basic list of minimum stuff I always have on me. Of course a 22 rifle and other items would lead to more comfort but that all depends on how far you need to walk and how many days you are from civilization.
PS- Don't forget to bring your cell phone charger and charge your phone before you walk out. Never know where you will get a signal.

big rick
07-03-2013, 04:28 PM
Okay, so we've packed all this stuff into our rigs...now where do we sit!!! Not sure there'd be any room left...ha!


Big Rick
Go Chargers

OverlanderJK
07-03-2013, 04:32 PM
I can pack enough to last a couple weeks in about 3 8 gallon action packers. Some of you guys need to organize things better. Lol

Mr.T
07-04-2013, 04:00 AM
For water on desert trips, a 1.75 gal Rotpax container fits nicely behind each front seat on the floor (JK with rear seat out). Two Rotopax's for emergencies, and the rest in the cooler.

Items didn't see listed yet: Tire repair kit, and a rental satellite phone if your in an isolated area.

Sat phone rental is about $8/day. I've rented for two trips. Never actually had emergency needs -- no regrets.

:beer:

Miramontes
07-04-2013, 04:13 AM
I always have in my Jeep:

First aid back pack
3 gallons of water
sleeping bag
recovery gear
Hiking boots
power bars
jetboil with food packs
camelbak
compass
magnesium fire starter
knife

and a few others.

Chris

UncensoredAggression
07-04-2013, 05:35 AM
Ducktape! :d

TheRoyalDoyle
07-04-2013, 02:33 PM
And this is why I asked. See all the stuff I would have missed!

Sent from my HTC6435LVW using WAYALIFE mobile app

davantalus
07-05-2013, 10:50 PM
Bleach is my plan C. In case of dire emergency, you can add a little bit to a bottle filled with questionable water, shake it up, wait a few minutes, and you're good to go.

In a dire emergency, just drink the water. ;)

NFRs2000NYC
07-07-2013, 04:28 AM
In a dire emergency, just drink the water. ;)

If you drink standing water, the chances of you scooping up a parasite are pretty damn high. Picking up said parasite can cause vomiting/diarreah, leaving you in worse shape than before you started. Granted, if it is at the point of life and death, sure, drink it, since you have nothing to lose, but as a general rule when jeeping, try and purify it. I guess the advice is dependent on your definition of dire...if you are REALLY thirsty, it's a bad idea. If you are 30 minutes from certain death, you have nothing to lose, so drink up. In an emergency, drinking your own urine will buy you some time. I'd do that before drinking standing water.

UpsideUp
07-09-2013, 10:09 PM
Just a reminder. Drinking unpurified standing water wont make you sick for 4-7 days. Hopefully in time to get you rescued and to a hospital for antibiotics that kill said parasites. Drinking your own urine will save your life hut should he past ditch. It is full of your body's waste that it no longer wants. As well as a high sodium content. This could be bad or good. The body looses valuable sodium during perspiration. But extra salt also absorbs water compounding dehydration. I would definately drink the standing water first. Make a solar still if you must or a water filter from your sock with leaves, rock, sand, and fire pit charcoal ilto purify the water but never forgo it in an emergancy. Remember the rule of 3's! 3 hours without shelter, 3 days without water, 3 weeks without food. But you need shelter to be able to live without the water and similar with the food. Otherwise dehydration can kill you in a very short amount of time.

UpsideUp
07-09-2013, 10:11 PM
Damn spell correct! Should have proofread before posting. Sorry guys.>:(

paychex.308
07-09-2013, 10:18 PM
i was taught that u can drink your own urine twice before it is too toxic. now i would drink it once before i drank standing water
, twice i am not too sure about.

andrew-

NFRs2000NYC
07-09-2013, 10:36 PM
i was taught that u can drink your own urine twice before it is too toxic. now i would drink it once before i drank standing water
, twice i am not too sure about.

andrew-

Fresh uring is sterile. Also, the first round (before you drank it again) still has water in it and will buy you some time. Again, it depends on the situation and where you are (Moab would be different than Colorado Mountains for instance)....knowledge is the most important thing...well...that and not panicking.

OverlanderJK
07-09-2013, 11:05 PM
i was taught that u can drink your own urine twice before it is too toxic. now i would drink it once before i drank standing water
, twice i am not too sure about.

andrew-

I drink my own urine every morning.

paychex.308
07-09-2013, 11:36 PM
I drink my own urine every morning.

we know....

andrew-

NFRs2000NYC
07-10-2013, 12:19 AM
I drink my own urine every morning.

:bleh:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUFQ2ECfPOw

OverlanderJK
07-10-2013, 01:16 AM
:bleh:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUFQ2ECfPOw

:thumb: :D

Mudigger70
07-17-2013, 02:19 PM
In my jeep

1. Henry .17 in scabbard
2. Several different knives for different uses to cleaning animals to sharpening wood
3. 3 different fire starters bc fire is essential Water proof wind proof matches. Flint steel rod with striker and a magnesium black with striker
4. Garmin Rhino 530. Handheld gps with radio and weather radio with tons of other features that makes this piece of kit essential
5. Space blankets, para cord, water purification tablets.
6. For food MREs are great choice( not always taste) but u can throw them in and forget about them and great survival food.
7. Camelback
8. An axe
9. Flashlights and head lights. Batteries also
10. First aid kit.
All of this is in a survival pack in the jeep but there's a second break away pack inside the main one with the bare essentials just incase

Mr.T
07-19-2013, 02:05 AM
Spare door/ignition key :doh:

familytime2
07-19-2013, 02:11 AM
:beer::thinking::beer::beer::beer::yup:

NFRs2000NYC
07-19-2013, 02:43 AM
Spare door/ignition key :doh:

Oh yea, always a second key. If you travel with a companion, give one to them. If not, get a magnetic key hide.

Mudigger70
07-19-2013, 02:44 AM
I like you style🍻🍻🍻

jkrossi
07-19-2013, 03:52 AM
Flair gun or a flair pen to take up less space. But dont start a forest fire!!!

Ldogg
07-19-2013, 03:56 AM
Paracord monkey fist...

40486

Click the link to see better pics and a video of why it's bad ass.
http://www.paracordist.com/the-steel-saints-riding-lanyard/?fullSite=1

jhires
07-19-2013, 04:20 AM
For basic survival,
Water filter or purification tabs
Fire Starter kit (tender, matches, lighter, flint, etc...)
Sharp Pocket Knife
parachord.
S&W 1911 +ammo
flashlight

Everything else is just a luxury. Not saying that there isn't a lot more I carry if traveling remotely. But if I had to strip down to basics, I could make due with the above for quite a while.

Things I carry in my Jeep all the time are all of the above and below except the .45
first aid kit
machette
Gallon of water
Tools (light mechanical and light electrical, BFH, crowbar)
Tow strap
Ratchet tie downs
Toilette paper
Zip ties
Duc Tape
Bailing Wire
Hatchet
flashlights (3x + extra batteries)
Fire extinguisher
two camp chairs
Dog treats and bowl.
blankets
2 jackets, 2 hoodies, 2 ski hats (weather and temp drastically and unpredictably change quickly here)
Bug Spray
Bug wipes

Things I add when I hit the trail
Shovel
Axe
Bow saw
tent
sleeping bags and pads
camp stove and fuel
lantern
Food for duration of trip plus extra depending on remoteness for my wife, Emma our dog, and myself.
Snacks
clothes
S&W 1911 +ammo

I personally always carry extra ibuprofen as I get frequent headaches and refuse to let them stop me.
My wife has a few meds she needs so we pack extra of those.


However, the largest part of survival is education and keeping your head about you.
My wife and I grew up together in the same small town. Both of our fathers were outdoorsmen (hers a logger, mine a forester) who taught us how to get by, we also had two exceptional teachers in school where we were taught things such as signalling a plane, starting a fire, building a shelter, and would get docked points if the teacher did a pocket knife spot check and you did NOT have a knife on you (Thanks Mr McGee). We were required to take Mrs. Millers first aid course that not only focused on the basics like cpr, stopping bleeding, and making splints, but how to do it with limited material and in the outdoors. Our final exercise was in the snow on a ski hill in winter where we were forced to use what we had learned previously in Mr McGee's class. Out of everything we did not get from our public education, these classes were two of the most valuable I've ever taken and have served us well over the years.

I would recommend both a survival class and first aid class for anyone who has not had some sort of education in either.

Mudigger70
07-19-2013, 04:55 PM
For basic survival,
Water filter or purification tabs
Fire Starter kit (tender, matches, lighter, flint, etc...)
Sharp Pocket Knife
parachord.
S&W 1911 +ammo
flashlight

Everything else is just a luxury. Not saying that there isn't a lot more I carry if traveling remotely. But if I had to strip down to basics, I could make due with the above for quite a while.

Things I carry in my Jeep all the time are all of the above and below except the .45
first aid kit
machette
Gallon of water
Tools (light mechanical and light electrical, BFH, crowbar)
Tow strap
Ratchet tie downs
Toilette paper
Zip ties
Duc Tape
Bailing Wire
Hatchet
flashlights (3x + extra batteries)
Fire extinguisher
two camp chairs
Dog treats and bowl.
blankets
2 jackets, 2 hoodies, 2 ski hats (weather and temp drastically and unpredictably change quickly here)
Bug Spray
Bug wipes

Things I add when I hit the trail
Shovel
Axe
Bow saw
tent
sleeping bags and pads
camp stove and fuel
lantern
Food for duration of trip plus extra depending on remoteness for my wife, Emma our dog, and myself.
Snacks
clothes
S&W 1911 +ammo

I personally always carry extra ibuprofen as I get frequent headaches and refuse to let them stop me.
My wife has a few meds she needs so we pack extra of those.


However, the largest part of survival is education and keeping your head about you.
My wife and I grew up together in the same small town. Both of our fathers were outdoorsmen (hers a logger, mine a forester) who taught us how to get by, we also had two exceptional teachers in school where we were taught things such as signalling a plane, starting a fire, building a shelter, and would get docked points if the teacher did a pocket knife spot check and you did NOT have a knife on you (Thanks Mr McGee). We were required to take Mrs. Millers first aid course that not only focused on the basics like cpr, stopping bleeding, and making splints, but how to do it with limited material and in the outdoors. Our final exercise was in the snow on a ski hill in winter where we were forced to use what we had learned previously in Mr McGee's class. Out of everything we did not get from our public education, these classes were two of the most valuable I've ever taken and have served us well over the years.

I would recommend both a survival class and first aid class for anyone who has not had some sort of education in either.

I agree. Haha u named alot of stuff I have in my jeep I just forgot. But your absolutely right the best tool in any survival situation is knowledge and not to panic. Panic leads to rash decisions and rash decisions lead to injury or death.