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GCM 2
05-02-2012, 10:02 PM
Like a handful of JK owners running ProRock 60 full float axles, I often get asked the "what is/why run full float axles......."question. Well, Offroad Evolution just posted this photo on their Facebook page of probably the best visual explanation of what is a "Full Float Axle". From this visual, you can see the tire/wheel is still bolted to the spindle on the outer axle housing tube, yet the the drive axle is almost completely pulled from the axle housing.
Some benefits of the full float axle are:
-all the weight of the vehicle is supported by the axle tube/housing. The axle shaft bears no load carrying capacity. Axle housing load capacities are significantly greater on full floats when compared to semi-float axles. Very important when running larger than 37"s
-the axle shaft serves only to transfer rotational power to wheels, nothing else.
-if you snap an axle, simply pull the broken shaft, and because you still have a functioning rolling tire on that corner you can continue(albeit carefully) with only one rear wheel being driven. If you carry spare axle shafts, simply replace with a new one on the trail!
-axle shafts are not C-clip'd into the differential carrier, so no need to break the diff cover seal if the axle should break.
-this is old school and not done much anymore, but you can also add locking wheel hubs to vehicles with rear full float axles. The purpose for this if the vehicle normally gets towed to the trail or behind motor homes. Simply unlock hubs and this allows for free spinning rear wheels while being towed, no need to remove driveshafts to isolate the drivetrain.
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piginajeep
05-02-2012, 10:10 PM
Strength! Nice write up

GCM 2
05-02-2012, 10:14 PM
Strength! Nice write up

You got it brother, strength is where it's at, it gets you home......or maybe that was chrome :thinking:

wayoflife
05-02-2012, 10:49 PM
Well said and great post!! I think a lot of people can learn from this :thumb:

MTG
05-02-2012, 11:38 PM
This was helpful. :thumb: And then I spent some time the dynatrac website learning more, then looking at my own axles and seeing what upgrades are available, and now posting on the forum in response to your post. Repeat X times per day and that is exactly how I lose productivity throughout the day. :doh:

GCM 2
05-02-2012, 11:53 PM
This was helpful. :thumb: And then I spent some time the dynatrac website learning more, then looking at my own axles and seeing what upgrades are available, and now posting on the forum in response to your post. Repeat X times per day and that is exactly how I lose productivity throughout the day. :doh:

I think in the world of the interweb it's referred to as "click-thru's", you see one thing on a page, then see another and click to that, and so on, and so on. Eventually you will reach the end of the Internet!

But back on topic, if you ever are in the position as to going big with tires and/or power, seriously don't waste your time with semi-float axles, I would even argue to wait until you can save the extra coin for the full float upgrade. I'm not saying that a semi-float is all that bad, but they are just not as good as full float and the peace of mind that comes with their strength. I have wheeled both with guys that have broken semi- and full float Dana 60's and take a guess who was back on the trail in under 30 minutes.

JKRay
05-03-2012, 12:59 AM
Awesome info, and great points!! :thumb:

Serg5000
05-03-2012, 01:05 AM
So with a full floating setup. If you break an axle, you said just replace with spare. How do you remove the broken piece without removing the diff cover.
Maybe I missed something.

GCM 2
05-03-2012, 01:39 AM
So with a full floating setup. If you break an axle, you said just replace with spare. How do you remove the broken piece without removing the diff cover.
Maybe I missed something.

Unfortunately, you can't always get the entire shaft out on the trail :naw: , but you can remove the outer most broken section at the wheel and continue motoring off the trail under 3x4 power, that is the important take away part of the post!

StrizzyChris
05-03-2012, 01:59 AM
So with a full floating setup. If you break an axle, you said just replace with spare. How do you remove the broken piece without removing the diff cover.
Maybe I missed something.

If you look at the picture you can see what they are talking about. The Axle shaft "floats" in the axle between the differential and the hub.
2025
The Wheel is mounted directly to the hub/axle itself, and the axle shaft slides in through the end and bolts on externally. It does not bear any weight of the wheel/vehicle at all. It is pretty much only responicible for transfering power to the wheels.
2026
As you can see in the pics, if the shaft is broken you just slide it out from the center of the hub/wheel. You never have to even remove the wheel from the axle to get it out. You then drive off under 3 wheel power.


A Semi-float axle, the wheel is mounted to the end of the axle shaft. In this scenario the axle shaft itself is responcible for rotational force transmission, AND the weight of the vehicle. This is where the major difference and importance comes into place.
2027
If you are running large aftermarket tires, carry a lot of weight on your jeep, or place you wheel into a binding situation, this will be your weakest link on the trail. Many people will snap an axle shaft under too much "load" placed on this kind of design. If you break this kind of axle shaft, you can not just remove the shaft because the wheel itself mounts stricktly to the shaft. You will have to do a lot of work disassembling the axle just to getting yourself rolling again.

Some people will never have an issue with a semi-float, but if you "go big" and "go hard" youll definitely want to considera full float, but prepare to open that wallet!

wayoflife
05-03-2012, 02:26 AM
wow, nice addition strizzychris :thumb:

Serg5000
05-03-2012, 02:45 AM
Thanks for the clarity. Awesome pictures to help describe what is. Sing discussed. Thanks for taking the time to write this up.

StrizzyChris
05-03-2012, 04:11 AM
wow, nice addition strizzychris :thumb:

I destroyed google about a year or two ago, just reading, trying to figure all this out. I'm just glad I have found the fellow Jeepers on here to give me an earfull so many times also!


Thanks for the clarity. Awesome pictures to help describe what is. Sing discussed. Thanks for taking the time to write this up.

No problem brother! Stay with this site, and people are very open and personable. Its a smaller community(for now) and you get only good people who are more than willing to help ya out!

mmccurdy
05-03-2012, 06:12 AM
... would have saved me pulling my diff apart a few weeks ago up on the trail. That is, at least until I got back to town, then pulled the diff apart, and realized my locker was trashed because the shaft broke right next to (or inside?) the carrier.

Full floaters are a much better design, for sure, and I wish I were running them. But for the sake of fanning the flames :munching:, I'd just point out that they're not a cure-all to your axle woes. :cool:


http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7204/6991896408_931da309f6_b.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7036/6991896106_62505a457b_b.jpg

Hightower
05-03-2012, 01:47 PM
Thanks Greg

wayoflife
05-03-2012, 01:50 PM
... would have saved me pulling my diff apart a few weeks ago up on the trail. That is, at least until I got back to town, then pulled the diff apart, and realized my locker was trashed because the shaft broke right next to (or inside?) the carrier.

Full floaters are a much better design, for sure, and I wish I were running them. But for the sake of fanning the flames :munching:, I'd just point out that they're not a cure-all to your axle woes. :cool:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7204/6991896408_931da309f6_b.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7036/6991896106_62505a457b_b.jpg

now that's what i call a hell of a break!! :clap2: but, for the sake of fanning the flames :munching:, I'd just like to point out that had you been running a full float pro rock 60 to help compensate for all your extra weight, this break wouldn't have occured. :D ;)

mmccurdy
05-03-2012, 05:02 PM
now that's what i call a hell of a break!! :clap2: but, for the sake of fanning the flames :munching:, I'd just like to point out that had you been running a full float pro rock 60 to help compensate for all your extra weight, this break wouldn't have occured. :D ;)

I actually disagree in this case. It was more a question of having the wheel wedged in a hole under a back-cut lip at the bottom of the obstacle, combined with application of throttle to a locked up axle. It was a dumb move, in retrospect, but even much stouter axles would have been hard pressed to hold up. Think double whammy ;)

Also, what extra weight? Tires? When this happened I was running my soft top, no rack, no tent, not even any gear to speak of except for tools and spares.

wayoflife
05-03-2012, 05:06 PM
I actually disagree in this case. It was more a question of having the wheel wedged in a hole under a back-cut lip at the bottom of the obstacle, combined with application of throttle to a locked up axle. It was a dumb move, in retrospect, but even much stouter axles would have been hard pressed to hold up. Think double whammy ;)

hmmm, that would be a tough situation but, i'd still be willing to bet that your axle wouldn't have broken if you were running a full float 60. granted, you still would have broken something but, it probably would have been a drive shaft u-joint. trust me, been there - done that.


Also, what extra weight? Tires? When this happened I was running my soft top, no rack, no tent, not even any gear to speak of except for tools and spares.

yeah, based on what you described above, i'm sure weight was not a factor here.