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Thread: What air pressure do you go to?

  1. #1
    Been Around the Block Clearskies's Avatar
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    What air pressure do you go to?

    With my recent experience losing two tires, partially because I had my pressure down to about 8 lbs... that and the rock!
    I'm curious what pressure people air down to.

  2. #2
    Administrator wayoflife's Avatar
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    For easier trails or for bombing across the desert, I like to be running about 16-18 psi. Enough to soften things up but not so much where sidewall flex becomes or damage like you had becomes a concern. On harder trails were I more traction is needed, 8-10 psi seems to do well for me. In really soft conditions like snow, I'll drop down as low as 4 if needed. Of course, this is something you can only really do if you have bead locks.

  3. #3
    Been Around the Block Clearskies's Avatar
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    For the most part I usually run 15, Since this was the first time running beadlocks I went down to 8. Also I live in the mountains and I'll be interested in how well low pressure does in the snow and ice this winter. I was mostly curious what other people run in various conditions.

  4. #4
    Administrator wayoflife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clearskies View Post
    For the most part I usually run 15, Since this was the first time running beadlocks I went down to 8. Also I live in the mountains and I'll be interested in how well low pressure does in the snow and ice this winter. I was mostly curious what other people run in various conditions.
    Just because you can doesn't always mean that you need to or even should. For a trail like Miller, I wouldn't bother going down that low.

  5. #5
    That dude from Mississippi notnalc68's Avatar
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    I canít add much to what Eddie said, but if I were flying in the blind on it, Iíd keep as much air as possible, as long as I were still getting decent traction.


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  6. #6
    Been Around the Block Clearskies's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by wayoflife View Post
    Just because you can doesn't always mean that you need to or even should. For a trail like Miller, I wouldn't bother going down that low.
    Roger that, just trying out my new toys... thanks for the input

  7. #7
    Been Around the Block Gbint's Avatar
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    Notnalc68 nailed it. Keep as much for comfort and traction. Remember, the bigger the tire the less pressure as you have more air volume. Monster trucks run 4-6 psi a small utility trailer tire runs about 60.


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  8. #8
    Knows a Thing or Two Samuelh3's Avatar
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    I have my stauns set for 8-9 PSI. I usually monitor the TPMS gauge and will take them off when they hit 12-14 if I donít plan to do hard wheeling. Mainly cause I donít feel like it taking forever to sit back up. 90% of the time Iím rock crawling and enjoy the traction it gives me.


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  9. #9
    Nothing but a Thing Speedy_RCW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wayoflife View Post
    Just because you can doesn't always mean that you need to or even should. For a trail like Miller, I wouldn't bother going down that low.
    Exactly. For runs such as the kick off run you were on, I was running about 17 even though I have beadlocks. When itís slow going in the rocks Iíll drop to 8 or 6. Match your pressure to what youíre doing. No one wants to bomb across the desert of 4 psi if you catch my drift.


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  10. #10
    Hooked farrier's Avatar
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    On our jeep seeing as it's only a TJ with 15's we go down at the lowest to 15, no bead locks and c rated tires 15 psi is real squishy plus with the coopers they are sticky enough I've had no issues other than to much traction at times lol, short wheelbase joke there, the run we just did with Eddie and the gang we did at 20 lbs which kept our tires on the rims chasing Eddie when he sped up a bit in the hoopties

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