Page 1 of 149 1231151101 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 1485

Thread: Roof Rack + Snorkel = Overland?

  1. #1
    Administrator wayoflife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Carson City, NV
    Posts
    52,273

    Post Roof Rack + Snorkel = Overland?

    So, I've been having some conversations about suspension systems and the topic of "rock crawling" versus "overland" came up and I have to say, I have no real idea what building up a Jeep for "overland" or "expedition" wheeling is all about. I mean this in all seriousness but really, what constitutes "overland" anyway? More times than not, when we go wheeling, we plan extended camping trips, wheel across vast stretches of desert and/or mountains of which sometimes require carrying extra gas and water and of course, we always carry a welder and enough gear to not only recover and fix our Jeep with all its unique parts but, also for others with their specific parts. Having said all that, we always try to build up our Jeeps not to be a "rock crawler" or "overland expedition" vehicle per se but, to perform to the best of their ability on and off road - period. In fact, up until a few years ago, we honestly thought that "overland" referred to a Jeep that had a roof rack and a snorkel on it. So, I ask you - here in America, what exactly is "overland" wheeling and, how exactly does a Jeep built up for that differ from any other good Jeep build? Inquiring minds would like to know

  2. #2
    Living the WAYALIFE MTG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Reno eNVy
    Posts
    13,638
    Built for overland = install an AEV lift?

    Sorry I saw the other thread and could not resist.

    I am way too much of a noob to know...subscribed to be educated.

  3. #3
    Word Ninja Sharkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    11,975
    I'm not sure what "overland" is supposed to mean either. Particularly here in the states, I think the more appropriate term would be a "wilderness" Jeep. To me, travel in the wilderness requires many things the most important of which are (1) the ability to self-rescue because of the inability to obtain assistance or reach civilization in less than one day's hike and (2) self-sustenance without the need for re-ration or support (food, water, equipment, etc.) from civilization for the period of time traveled.

    Depending on your mode of travel, and the topography of what is to be traveled, the gear you bring to satisfy (1) and (2) above will obviously change. I fail to see how having a flip-top tent on the roof of a Jeep makes it more wilderness capable than another Jeep that has a 4-season tent or bivy sack stored in a bag in the back. Actually, I can think of many reasons why the latter would be a MUCH better way to go than the former. (If your Jeep becomes inoperable in the wilderness, it's pretty hard to carry your flip top tent on your back to use as shelter on your multi-day hike out...oh, and there is that whole weight savings thing.) I also fail to see how a Jeep with 35's and a standard lift is somehow more wilderness capable than a Jeep turning 40's with coilovers. The only argument I could see is if the distance traveled is so great that the relative difference in gas mileage becomes an issue which cannot be planned for through preparation (i.e. bringing extra gas). Here in the states though (particularly the lower 48), that problem seems unlikely.

    I guess my point is that "overland" has become more of a cliche for a type of look and less of a definition of capabilities. If your Jeep is built to cover the terrain you plan to cover, and you have the ability to fix it and perform self-rescue, then the rest really comes down to what else you throw in the back and what you have between your ears, not how the Jeep was built. Just my .02.
    Jeep parts and accessories purchased through the following link will help support this forum and at no cost to you.
    RECOMMENDED JEEP PARTS & ACCESSORIES

  4. #4
    Hooked zeddjb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkey View Post
    I'm not sure what "overland" is supposed to mean either. Particularly here in the states, I think the more appropriate term would be a "wilderness" Jeep. To me, travel in the wilderness requires many things the most important of which are (1) the ability to self-rescue because of the inability to obtain assistance or reach civilization in less than one day's hike and (2) self-sustenance without the need for re-ration or support (food, water, equipment, etc.) from civilization for the period of time traveled.

    Depending on your mode of travel, and the topography of what is to be traveled, the gear you bring to satisfy (1) and (2) above will obviously change. I fail to see how having a flip-top tent on the roof of a Jeep makes it more wilderness capable than another Jeep that has a 4-season tent or bivy sack stored in a bag in the back. Actually, I can think of many reasons why the latter would be a MUCH better way to go than the former. (If your Jeep becomes inoperable in the wilderness, it's pretty hard to carry your flip top tent on your back to use as shelter on your multi-day hike out...oh, and there is that whole weight savings thing.) I also fail to see how a Jeep with 35's and a standard lift is somehow more wilderness capable than a Jeep turning 40's with coilovers. The only argument I could see is if the distance traveled is so great that the relative difference in gas mileage becomes an issue which cannot be planned for through preparation (i.e. bringing extra gas). Here in the states though (particularly the lower 48), that problem seems unlikely.

    I guess my point is that "overland" has become more of a cliche for a type of look and less of a definition of capabilities. If your Jeep is built to cover the terrain you plan to cover, and you have the ability to fix it and perform self-rescue, then the rest really comes down to what else you throw in the back and what you have between your ears, not how the Jeep was built. Just my .02.
    I think you said it all right there. I live in central WI and let me be the first to say that, we don't really any mountains around here. At least for me, when I want to go wheeling for a while there are tons of forestry roads/trails that can keep me busy. That being said, I built up my Jeep with a cost savings in mind. I don't wheel for a living and don't get paid to wheel and I don't have a lot of money to spend on awesome upgrades, however I have a winch (that covers the self recovery mostly), I carry some tools with me and I have a 4 inch lift kit with nitto mud-grapplers 35x12.5x17. I built my Jeep to get me though the terrain in and around where I live, but if I wanted to take it to more extreme areas of the country like the rubicon, I could do that too.

    I agree that "overland" is definitely a cliche and I would argue with anyone who thought differently.

  5. #5
    Old Timer JKRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    3,054
    I always thought overland was jeeps that took on open spaces, like the plains and meadows or like the outback in Australia that is what an overland jeep is to me. Just my

  6. #6
    Word Ninja Sharkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    11,975
    Quote Originally Posted by JKRay
    I always thought overland was jeeps that took on open spaces, like the plains and meadows or like the outback in Australia that is what an overland jeep is to me. Just my
    I think your perception is the same as most people's. But it doesn't answer the question posed as to why one type of build (and what that type of build would be exactly) would be more suited for that kind of travel than another type of build. Using WOL's Moby as an example, why is Moby any less suited for travel across open spaces, plains, meadows, or the Outback than another Jeep? I don't think it is, but apparently some people do.
    Jeep parts and accessories purchased through the following link will help support this forum and at no cost to you.
    RECOMMENDED JEEP PARTS & ACCESSORIES

  7. #7
    Hooked zeddjb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkey View Post
    I think your perception is the same as most people's. But it doesn't answer the question posed as to why one type of build (and what that type of build would be exactly) would be more suited for that kind of travel than another type of build. Using WOL's Moby as an example, why is Moby any less suited for travel across open spaces, plains, meadows, or the Outback than another Jeep? I don't think it is, but apparently some people do.

    I think it's more capable or just as capable as any other Jeep. Like you said, it's perception thing that people have. There is no rhyme or reason to it, it's just the way people see things differently.

    I would be curious to know WOL, how this question came to be. I know you said the topic came up, but was there a valid argument on the topic or was is just, "Hey I heard this somewhere..." kind of thing?

  8. #8
    Word Ninja Sharkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    11,975
    I can't speak for WOL, but I can say I've read numerous comments where people discount advice about lifts on the basis that "they are building an overland Jeep, not a rock crawler" without ever taking the time to explain what they view as a legitimate distinction between the two. If they were talking about purpose built buggies then I might understand the point, but a JKU on coilovers seems every bit as capable to me as an "overlander", if not more so, than any other JKU build.
    Jeep parts and accessories purchased through the following link will help support this forum and at no cost to you.
    RECOMMENDED JEEP PARTS & ACCESSORIES

  9. #9
    Hooked zeddjb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkey View Post
    I can't speak for WOL, but I can say I've read numerous comments where people discount advice about lifts on the basis that "they are building an overland Jeep, not a rock crawler" without ever taking the time to explain what they view as a legitimate distinction between the two. If they were talking about purpose built buggies then I might understand the point, but a JKU on coilovers seems every bit as capable to me as an "overlander", if not more so, than any other JKU build.
    Right on!! If there isn't a valid argument then it's just one person's point of view over another.


  10. #10
    Old Timer JKRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    3,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkey View Post
    I think your perception is the same as most people's. But it doesn't answer the question posed as to why one type of build (and what that type of build would be exactly) would be more suited for that kind of travel than another type of build. Using WOL's Moby as an example, why is Moby any less suited for travel across open spaces, plains, meadows, or the Outback than another Jeep? I don't think it is, but apparently some people do.
    I think really the overland look is exactly that a look nothing more, the suspension is the same as most who rock crawl, tires and more. There really is no difference. Moby for example now that he has the upgraded DTD front and rear is one of the best open land and rock crawling vehicle that can be built same for evo 1. The suspension is made to go fast on flat open country roads and play hard on rocks. Its the best of both worlds the only difference is the look. They both dont have a roof rack, or tent on top of their vehicle, and a snorkel. Besides that there is no difference to me at least.

    Just thinking now the overland vehicles started in places like Africa or Australia to keep safe from dangerous animals like lions. The tent on top is to stay safe from snakes, lions and other dangers that can get to them if they were on the ground. The snorkel to cross rivers or creeks without killing the engine. Its really to stay safe from what is surrounding them and get out of crap to get home nothing else.

Page 1 of 149 1231151101 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
“wayoflife” is a moniker that I’ve been using for 20 years now and I chose it because I think it does a great job of explaining, in simple terms, the passion I have for Jeeps and the Jeep way of life. This is a lifestyle that transcends age, gender and race as the only thing you need to be a part of it is a love for the outdoors, a desire to explore, a yearning to take on a challenge and a will to conquer it. Over the years, Cindy and I have attempted to capture the essence of this lifestyle through photographs and videos and share it with others around the world. And, this is how WAYALIFE was born.
Join us
WATCH OUR VIDEOS