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View Full Version : RECOVERY GEAR : A Must Have Before Hitting the Trails



wayoflife
11-27-2012, 11:54 PM
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322492
If there's one question I get asked all the time from new Jeepers it's, “what’s the first mod I should do to my Jeep?” And, my answer to them is always the same, “recovery gear”. Fact of the matter is, whether you’re new to the world of off-roading with a right off the show room floor stock Jeep, or a long time veteran with a highly modified built up trail rig, everyone gets into a jam sooner or later.

Tow Points
At the top of the list of things that every Jeeper should have, it's tow hooks, D-ring mounts or some kind of recovery point (like a hitch receiver) on the front and rear of their Jeep. A good tow hook or recovery point will bolt directly to your Jeep’s frame or to an aftermarket heavy duty steel bumper that's been reinforced to act as a frame crossmember. Without this basic and very affordable modification to your Jeep, you won’t be able to help anybody get out of a jam let alone get yourself out if needed.

Factory Jeep JK Wrangler Tow Hook
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=1042

Universal Hitch Receiver Shackle
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322522


Tow Strap
Now, a tow point is pretty useless without if you don't have anything to pull or be pulled with and so, the next piece of recovery that every Jeeper should have with them at all times is a tow strap. A good tow strap should be at least 20-30 feet long, have NO metal hooks or clips on it (these are extremely dangerous and should never be used) and has a pulling capacity about twice the weight of your Jeep. In the case of something like a Jeep JK Wrangler Unlimited which weighs a little over 5,000 lbs., I would recommend a strap that has a breaking strength rating of least 10,000 lbs. or more. For me, I use a 30 ft. ARB Snatch Strap that has a 100% nylon webbing construction, reinforced eyes, a genuine stretch of 20%, and a breaking strength of 8,000 kg or 17,640 lbs., basically, more than enough for a big heavy built up Jeep JK Wrangler Unlimited. What I like about the ARB Snatch Straps is that they come with a unique safety warning indicator built into them and signals you if your strap ever gets overloaded. Of course, any strap that meets the grade is better than nothing.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322510


Tree Saver
In addition to a tow strap, I would highly recommend that you get and carry a tree saver as well. Similar to a tow strap, a good tree saver will be a lot shorter and, as it’s name suggests, is used to wrap around trees that you intend to use as an anchor point. Doing this will help protect the tree from the kind of severe damage that can occur from wrapping a winch cable or recovery chain directly to it. For my purposes, I carry an ARB Tree Truck Protector which has a 3″ webbing made out of 100% polyester and has a breaking strenght of 12000kg/26,000 lbs.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322516


D-Ring Shackles
Because they are extremely strong and can be separated with ease, a good pair of 3/4" D-Ring shackles is a must have in any recovery bag. D-Ring shackles are great for safely linking tow straps together, securing a snatch block to an ARB Tree Trunk Protector and they will give you more options when helping to recover another vehicle or when getting the help from them.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322498


Snatch Block
For those of you who have a winch, I would highly recommend that you carry a good snatch block. Essentially a big pulley, a snatch block will allow you to double your winch's capacity if more pulling power is needed and, give you more winching options as well. Attached to a fixed point like a tree or vehicle, you can also use a snatch block as a vector point to triangulate your pull. This option can be especially useful in areas that are difficult to find solid ground or where obsticals and/or terrain prevent you from establishing a safe straight pull.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322495


Recovery Chain
While it wouldn't be my first choice of things to use, I do carry a short heavy duty recovery chain as it will offer more options when helping to recover a vehicle that has no tow hooks or built in tow points. In a situation like this, a chain can be hooked or wrapped around a secure part of a vehicles frame and then be used as a tow point.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322501


Gloves
A good pair of leather gloves is something everyone should carry especially if you’re still running a steel wire rope on your winch. Gloves do a great job of helping you to have a better grip on your equipment, protect your hands from rope burns and help prevent steel splinters from lancing you when handling wire winch rope.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322519


Shovel
Sometimes, the smartest way to get yourself out of a jam is to just do a little digging and because of this, I always carry a small collapsable shovel with me. It may not be the most effective tool but, it's better than using your hands.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322504


Recovery Bag
Last but not least, having something to carry all your recovery gear is in my opinion, a must. If you can keep everything together and in one bag or container, it'll make it easier for you to remember to pack in your Jeep and ensure you always have it with you.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322528


Recovery gear is an investment that every Jeeper should make. Isn't just a good idea to have, it's often required equipment on most organized runs and one that I can almost guarantee will pay for itself time and time again. :yup:

bdmckenna
11-28-2012, 12:11 AM
Bravo Eddie

OverlanderJK
11-28-2012, 12:27 AM
Great article! I have a shovel so I think I'm good to go. :cheesy:

Big-T
11-28-2012, 12:32 AM
Fantastic Write up Eddie

Thundercat68
11-28-2012, 01:58 AM
:clap2: Great info. :clap2:

Serg5000
11-28-2012, 02:14 AM
This was the first purchase I made. Great advice Eddie.

MTG
11-28-2012, 02:48 AM
Sound advice. Have all but the chain. In case people don't know ARB sells recovery bags with most of this stuff already in it, as do several of the popular vendors.

JaySC
11-28-2012, 02:50 AM
Good stuff...thanks for the advice. It really helps people like me who don't know very much and want to learn.

Asgard
11-28-2012, 04:30 AM
Thanks for the advice, makes figuring out my purchase priorities a bit easier.

Jersey_Devil
11-28-2012, 04:42 AM
Great write up! I got the HiLift recovery kit and built off that with snatch block, 30' strap and tree saver.... Few other lil trinkets too! All offroad necessities covered!

wayoflife
11-28-2012, 06:07 AM
I'm glad to hear that this post has been helpful to you. I've had a few people ask me about how much it would cost to put something like this together and what I can tell you is that companies like WARN offer a kit that costs about $400.

7997

http://www.quadratec.com/products/92115_51.htm

So you know, you can definitely piece something together for less but, aside from a shovel, this kit is pretty complete. Also, I know there were some on Facebook who thought that I was crazy for including a chain in my recovery bag but, as you can see, WARN includes one in theirs too. The way I see it, if you don't like it - don't use it.

JAGS
11-28-2012, 06:26 AM
Yep! The first mod I made was the recovery mod. No winch yet, but have full recovery kit and hi lift extreme. Also have a cb as part of safety/communication kit.

Read about this here an project jk several months ago when I got my jeep.

Great advice and highly recommend getting all you can afford on eddies list and the save for the rest.

RockIt Man
11-28-2012, 06:55 AM
So you know, you can definitely piece something together for less but, aside from a shovel, this kit is pretty complete. Also, I know there were some on Facebook who thought that I was crazy for including a chain in my recovery bag but, as you can see, WARN includes one in theirs too. The way I see it, if you don't like it - don't use it.

Like you said, it is not always a first choice maybe even a second...

I work as a career firefighter and one of phrases we use often in training is, "It's just another tool in the toolbox". Usually we are speaking metaphorically about a technique or a certain method etc.

However in this case, it's a literal translation!:yup:

Linebacker
11-28-2012, 01:51 PM
Thanks for the excellent article. The recovery bag is a really good item for my Christmas wish list.:yup:

1BAMFR
11-28-2012, 07:51 PM
The first time offroading all I had was a tire gauge....NOW, I have a complete arsenal of shit I carry EVERYWHERE!

OJK12
11-29-2012, 06:28 AM
Awesome thread for sure this gets overlooked all the time!!!

JK-UTE
01-23-2013, 12:14 AM
Great advice... You need to be able to help yourself as best as possible.

Donttread
01-23-2013, 12:37 AM
I saw some of the negative reviews some people said. In any sense, overkill is looked at as overkill until somebody needs it...then all of a sudden you're a savior.


-Molon labe-

TrailBear
01-23-2013, 01:28 AM
I would like to suggest taking the time to get familiar with what's in your kit and how to use it. This last weekend we were in the snow with one stock unlimited stuck, another member hooked a strap on to pull him out, some members had him tighten up the slack before pulling, all he did is get himself stuck. I backed up pulled the first jeep, they tried to have me pull up the slack, I knew better, left a bit of slack had him start going then gave a small tug and out he came. I'm going to make a point to make sure the club practice's a bit next time out.


Don't let fear and common sense hold you back:)
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GCM 2
01-23-2013, 01:33 AM
Great advice... You need to be able to help yourself as best as possible.


I saw some of the negative reviews some people said. In any sense, overkill is looked at as overkill until somebody needs it...then all of a sudden you're a savior.

-Molon labe-

Glad to see this thread get revived again! Had it not been for having a complete, well maintained set of recovery gear (I have the ARB version of the Warn kit Wayolife posted pictures of above) there is almost no way we would have gotten EVOJEEP back on his wheels last Saturday. Fortunately we had the right gear, and more importantly, knew how to use it properly. All of which made this a pretty darn easy task to get my rig back on all fours and finish the weekend run. Unfortunately this is not the first overturned vehicle I have helped to put back on its tires.

If you don't know about self-recovery;
1) at a minimum go buy a book
2) take a recovery class at a Jeep Jamboree or Expo
3) get involved out on the trail when people need help.
4) buy a block/pulley and use it! Don't wait for that "really hard pull/recovery" to get mechanical advantage. Use your pulley to save wear and tear on everything.

Somehow learn how to get yourself out of bad situations safely, then break your gear out of its packing and wrappers, practice setting it up, make sure everything works, and do some mock-recovery drills. It's never a good time to learn how to do when it's the real thing!

j.house013
01-26-2013, 07:33 AM
Yep! Just got my recovery hooks in the mail today from a fellow JK Forum member! (front and rear) Why a JKU with locking diff and elect-disconnect would be built without them I have no idea..... Now, problem solved! 13912

arashi
01-26-2013, 06:31 PM
Nice!

I was literally beginning to make a list of the things I needed for the beginning of the trailing season... You saved me some time :)


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CombatVetJK
03-20-2013, 08:21 AM
i have the ARB Premium Recovery Kit...its a little pricey but well worth the investment! came with everything needed in the strap department plus d-rings, gloves and a great snatch block, the bag is even large enough for an extra pair of gloves, winch remote and my throw away "home depot" tow strap. i would never leave home with plans to hit any trail without my recovery bag,
that shovel that Eddie showed in the pic (E Tool in the army) velcro's nicely across the c pillar cross bar with a couple of velcro straps to be out of the way but still accessible and secure when loaded with gear.

Miss Boss
04-05-2013, 12:33 PM
I saw some of the negative reviews some people said. In any sense, overkill is looked at as overkill until somebody needs it...then all of a sudden you're a savior.
-Molon labe-

So true!! :yup:

groovebus
05-23-2013, 07:47 PM
That's the first thing I bought. The wife kept asking why I needed all that stuff, I said, "I don't want to be that guy on the news found dead next to his Jeep because I didn't have something that I should have had." That includes the above stated equipment plus tire repair kit, 12 volt compressor, MRE's, 5 gal Gott water cooler and either my Ruger Mini-14 or my Remington 870 Express. I don't carry the water cooler or firearms around town. :)

BlackKnight
05-23-2013, 08:12 PM
Going to be picking up one of the ARB recovery kits once I get the Rig, Looks to have just about everything you need.

Tow Strap, tree strap, Winch extension strap(?), cable dampener, gloves, 2 shackles, snatch block, all in one of their large recovery bags.

Beyrgut
05-24-2013, 01:51 AM
Yeah the ARB kit is a nice setup, one of the first things I picked up after getting the jeep.

4X4PLAY
03-13-2014, 02:01 AM
Great article! I agree with everything.... BUT


D-Ring shackles are great for safely linking tow straps together

Linking two straps together with a d-ring is extremely dangerous and is cause for more than one wheeling death over the years. Two straps should NEVER be put together using a d-ring, if that strap was to come off the tow point or if a strap was to break that d-ring is going to become a projectile potentially killing someone if it hits them! Google it, I am sure you will find stories!

The best way to put two straps together is with a wooden dowel or stick, hell even a newspaper stuck in between will work ;)


Happy and SAFE wheeling!
Jeff

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 02:14 AM
Great article! I agree with everything.... BUT

Linking two straps together with a d-ring is extremely dangerous and is cause for more than one wheeling death over the years. Two straps should NEVER be put together using a d-ring, if that strap was to come off the tow point or if a strap was to break that d-ring is going to become a projectile potentially killing someone if it hits them! Google it, I am sure you will find stories!

IF you do not secure your tow strap to a solid point on the frame and in a way that it can't come off, yes, you are correct, this can be dangerous. IF you are using a cheap, under rated or worn out strap, yes, there is a potential for it to break making the d-ring a dangerous projectile. IF you Google it, you can find just about anything you want including how a tow hook or even entire bumper can get ripped off a Jeep and become a lethal projectile. But hey, what do I know.

BTW, welcome to WAYALIFE

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 02:38 AM
It's funny, most people come on to a forum like this and make their first post to talk about their Jeep and how much they love the forum. Of course, you came on here digging up old posts just to tell people how they are right or wrong about tow straps or snatch straps and even took the time to point them to YouTube videos you've made. :naw:

You my friend are clearly here to promote your own agenda and believe it or not, I have a rule for that:
http://wayalife.com/faq.php?faq=wayaliferules#faq_promoteagenda

You wanna leave on your own or do I need to show you the door?

ridg3runner
03-13-2014, 02:59 AM
The best way to put two straps together is with a wooden dowel or stick, hell even a newspaper stuck in between will work ;)
WTF kind of shrooms have you been chewing on?!! Were you born Stupid or was that something you had to work on?:screwy:

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10frank9
03-13-2014, 03:08 AM
I smell troll!!!! Jeep TJ Pirate Ship Edition? Sounds like the moron who came on to post he only goes on pIRATE 4x4 and had an affinity for Eddie's pony tail...


:asshat:

ridg3runner
03-13-2014, 03:12 AM
This guy is gonna get someone killed with his stupid ass ideas. Thankfully it won't be me.

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JK's JK
03-13-2014, 03:18 AM
WTF kind of shrooms have you been chewing on?!! Were you born Stupid or was that something you had to work on?:screwy:

Sent from my DROID4 using WAYALIFE mobile app

Your so aggressive Lee....:shock:

TrailBear
03-13-2014, 03:21 AM
I smell troll!!!! Jeep TJ Pirate Ship Edition? Sounds like the moron who came on to post he only goes on pIRATE 4x4 and had an affinity for Eddie's pony tail...


:asshat:

Says tj here but on the other site it's a jk?

4X4PLAY
03-13-2014, 03:23 AM
This guy is gonna get someone killed with his stupid ass ideas. Thankfully it won't be me.

Sent from my DROID4 using WAYALIFE mobile app

You guys can call me what you want, I wasn't being a troll, and Eddie, I didn't post any video on this thread. I am just an advocate for safety and what you posted is 100% wrong, I don't care how new your straps are, you DON'T hook two straps together using a clevis. I copied a story I read many years ago and it is a prime example why you don't put two straps together with a clevis.

It is so easy to put two straps together without having a projectile in between them.

I won't even waste my breath responding to the two idiot followers who obviously don't have a fawkin' clue.

You boys can flame me all you want, I know the proper and safe methods for recovery and it's a shame that you guys have to learn the hard way.

Peace!
Jeff



My best friend Died today at age of 37 Over a basic simple mistake!
We where at our truckwars/mudbog for The Moonlight stompers On Duffield RD.

After he broke his front end he decided to still play in 2wd. I had left and didn't see it happen but what happened was everyone got in a hurry and lots of trucks stuck with dozers and 6" straps all over the place ...
David was an advocate of safety But we'll never know what went through his head this time... But they broke the cardinal rule os Hooking 2 (small) 3" straps together with a Clevis (wich is like a rocket and what killed him)and David was unfortunate to have the brand new strap on his Jeep (they where out of 6" straps that day so he bought a 3") so when the strap let loose from the other Jeep while David was truned around looking backwards being pulled out from the back...The Clevis hit him in the head and killed him instantly..
He was the nicest man I know and would do anything for anyone!
He was survived by his Wife and 5 yr old Son Both where there the wife seen it happen the son still doesn't know and wont be told until tomorrow!
I will post funeral arrangements tomorrow and would request that anyone who cares PLEASE Show up and pay respects to his family..
He died doing what he loved best and the wife said it would be a blessing to her to see all his friend show suport!
He was the man that came Up to Grandmans and yogies with me....and if anyone has a picture of us in teh Jeep AT ALL could you post it here so we can print it out ...we are doing a clage of him and his Jeep for his wife and also a vidieo of him at all our mud bogs!
We will set up a trust fund for his wife at a later date! I will repost all this info when I get back in town or have my wife do it all because im going away for work for 4 weeks But I will get the info to you!
Any donations would be Great! also all vidios of that bog and of the vidieo of Just him will go to his wife!

SO please use this as a warning and be more careful of using to small of a strap while pulling out people..and try to never use a Clevis in the middle..
David knew this but failed to do it this one time probley figureing he wasn't stuck back and it would be ok and he paid for it with his Life

Armydog
03-13-2014, 03:25 AM
OP: awesome advice delivered well. Tango yet again


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Serg5000
03-13-2014, 03:26 AM
Believe it or not I have seen it before. I also want to say I see a piece of wood being used in an off road magazine. And no I'm not saying it's ok. Or not ok. I don't know. But if your in a real pinch, what does one do if you have link two straps together? Knowing that when using the choke method is the least strong way to use a strap.

ridg3runner
03-13-2014, 03:28 AM
YOU, Sir are dangerous and I pray NOBODY is stupid enough to wheel with you. I'd take a flying D-Ring any day of the week over a flying Jeep. You're no advocate for safety, you're a recipe for disaster!

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Armydog
03-13-2014, 03:29 AM
I saw some of the negative reviews some people said. In any sense, overkill is looked at as overkill until somebody needs it...then all of a sudden you're a savior.


-Molon labe-

Agreed. There is never a bad guy or situation that is "too dead", thus overkill is not a possibility


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Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 03:30 AM
he will prob yell at all mountain rescue teams for using carabiners :crazyeyes:

ttfhell
03-13-2014, 03:31 AM
He's talking about a stick in between the the loops created between the two straps. All this does is stop it from getting so tight you can't separate them after the pull.

Serg5000
03-13-2014, 03:39 AM
YOU, Sir are dangerous and I pray NOBODY is stupid enough to wheel with you. I'd take a flying D-Ring any day of the week over a flying Jeep. You're no advocate for safety, you're a recipe for disaster!

Sent from my DROID4 using WAYALIFE mobile app

You referring to me?

Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 03:42 AM
You referring to me?

i think he meant me, you see i use bubble gum to hold my straps together when the stitching rips out! :crazyeyes:

Serg5000
03-13-2014, 03:43 AM
In the April issue of Petersen's 4wheel&off-road magazine on page 54. They suggest using a rolled magazine or a wooden dowel. http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/13/a6ete4e8.jpg

ridg3runner
03-13-2014, 03:44 AM
No,Serg. The "Advocate for Safety" that dredged this old thread up to start with.

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ttfhell
03-13-2014, 03:44 AM
In the April issue of Petersen's 4wheel&off-road magazine on page 54. They suggest using a rolled magazine or a wooden dowel. http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/13/a6ete4e8.jpg

That's what I was talking about but way too lazy to look it up lol.

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 03:45 AM
You guys can call me what you want, I wasn't being a troll, and Eddie, I didn't post any video on this thread. I am just an advocate for safety and what you posted is 100% wrong, I don't care how new your straps are, you DON'T hook two straps together using a clevis. I copied a story I read many years ago and it is a prime example why you don't put two straps together with a clevis.

Oh I get it, you read a story a long time ago on the internet and so that has to make me 100% wrong. Well, all I can say is BONJOUR, I'm a French model :standing wave:


It is so easy to put two straps together without having a projectile in between them.

And it's just as impossible to take them apart after the fact. Not that I would be speaking from experience here or anything like that being the rookie that I am.


I know the proper and safe methods for recovery and it's a shame that you guys have to learn the hard way.

Well sure, you read about it on the internet so you must know the only way things should and shouldn't be done. Me, I so new to all this, what would I know.


He's talking about a stick in between the the loops created between the two straps. All this does is stop it from getting so tight you can't separate them after the pull.

You really think that'll be enough to keep it from getting so tight that you can't separate them? By all means, give it a try. :yup:

Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 03:48 AM
In the April issue of Petersen's 4wheel&off-road magazine on page 54. They suggest using a rolled magazine or a wooden dowel. http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/13/a6ete4e8.jpg

the wooden dowel is pretty pointless with that setup... like others have said it just makes it easier to pull it apart... but then again its not that hard to remove when its cinched :thinking:

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 03:49 AM
Since 4X4PLAY seemed to have missed it, I also carry a chain in my recovery kit. Why not give that grief as well? Why is using it any different?

Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 03:51 AM
Since 4X4PLAY seemed to have missed it, I also carry a chain in my recovery kit. Why not give that grief as well? Why is using it any different?

:eek::nuts::cheesy:

Armydog
03-13-2014, 04:07 AM
I have rigged many a heavy object for pulls and lifts. Mostly ductile iron pipe and stuff, but some vehicle pulls as well. ALWAYS use a shackle. Never use a choke with or without a stick.... Don't overload the straps, don't use worn or damaged straps and secure the load. I never have had an issue. Period


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MICP3309
03-13-2014, 04:24 AM
Working in emergency services, I do heavy rigging for Rescue applications, large vehicles and building stabilization post accident / collapse. I can say we use shackles EVERYWHERE!!! The Rescue Truck I work from has at least 35 of em in various sizes. We never travel without shackles, straps, and grade 80 chain. So if using shackles is "good enough" for life safety to hold a suspended load, and my ass has to depend on it to keep me from getting crushed, I think it can pull a Jeep out of trouble! But as for retrieving Jeeps, I trust what Eddie and you guys that have done THAT a lot have said!!

Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 04:27 AM
this is the kind of :asshat: that logs in just to say a figure 8 on a bite will slip... :doh:

David1tontj
03-13-2014, 06:01 AM
I have used d rings to hold straps together for a long time. I think they must have been using snatch straps and really yanking hard when it killed that guy. And if you're pulling that hard, you're just as likely to break a tow hook which can also be a projectile. If I'm so stuck that a simple tug won't work, then I pull out the winch for some slow, controlled, and safe recovery.

And let's not forget to be draping stuff over cables to weigh them down if something breaks. -I have used a d ring through my recovery bag to weigh down winch lines before. (The bag is nice and heavy, and it has a nice handle to make sure it stays on the line)


My ride- 2001 power wheel, 11" plastic tires, upgraded battery, boat sides, custom bumpers, tow hooks, new paint.

TreyJK
03-13-2014, 05:14 PM
I'm shocked at how offended some people get on this forum, it's absolutely ridiculous. And before I say more, please flame me for not having a high post count and therefore regard me as inexperienced, but from a completely unbiased standpoint, it seems that some people take Eddie's words to heart and viciously attack anyone else that has a different opinion. Don't get me wrong, Eddie and the Wayalife crew offer extremely valuable and helpful information but everyone can make a mistake every now and then. Personally, I have used the dowel method numerous times on hard pulls and it works fantastically at keeping the lines from getting so tight that you cannot remove them. So, Eddie, if this means that I somehow have an evil personal agenda, then please, by all means, cancel my membership on this forum. If that's all it takes then I don't want it. But remember that we're all adults, let's try to be polite and helpful to each other.

OverlanderJK
03-13-2014, 05:35 PM
I'm shocked at how offended some people get on this forum, it's absolutely ridiculous. And before I say more, please flame me for not having a high post count and therefore regard me as inexperienced, but from a completely unbiased standpoint, it seems that some people take Eddie's words to heart and viciously attack anyone else that has a different opinion. Don't get me wrong, Eddie and the Wayalife crew offer extremely valuable and helpful information but everyone can make a mistake every now and then. Personally, I have used the dowel method numerous times on hard pulls and it works fantastically at keeping the lines from getting so tight that you cannot remove them. So, Eddie, if this means that I somehow have an evil personal agenda, then please, by all means, cancel my membership on this forum. If that's all it takes then I don't want it. But remember that we're all adults, let's try to be polite and helpful to each other.

I think all your other bullshit in that post means you have an agenda. Stating a point is fine the other bullshit isn't necessary. If you don't like it here then leave.

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 05:49 PM
I'm shocked at how offended some people get on this forum, it's absolutely ridiculous.

And I'm shocked at how offended some people like you get on this forum as well - it's absolutely ridiculous.


And before I say more, please flame me for not having a high post count and therefore regard me as inexperienced

Your lack of a post count won't get you flamed, just your attitude or if you're here just to pimp something like 4X4PLAY.


but from a completely unbiased standpoint, it seems that some people take Eddie's words to heart and viciously attack anyone else that has a different opinion.

From a completely unbiased standpoint, it seems that guys like you like to viciously attack anyone that has a different opinion than yours.


Don't get me wrong, Eddie and the Wayalife crew offer extremely valuable and helpful information but everyone can make a mistake every now and then. Personally, I have used the dowel method numerous times on hard pulls and it works fantastically at keeping the lines from getting so tight that you cannot remove them.

So, the dowel method works for you and because of it, that automatically makes what I said some kind of a mistake, got it. :thumb:


So, Eddie, if this means that I somehow have an evil personal agenda, then please, by all means, cancel my membership on this forum. If that's all it takes then I don't want it. But remember that we're all adults, let's try to be polite and helpful to each other.

If the posts on this thread are all that is needed to get your panties in a bunch then, you really should just leave. I mean, if you're really an adult, that's all you have to do - no need than to be a drama queen and demand to have your membership cancelled. :rolleyes2:

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 05:53 PM
I have used d rings to hold straps together for a long time. I think they must have been using snatch straps and really yanking hard when it killed that guy. And if you're pulling that hard, you're just as likely to break a tow hook which can also be a projectile. If I'm so stuck that a simple tug won't work, then I pull out the winch for some slow, controlled, and safe recovery.

And let's not forget to be draping stuff over cables to weigh them down if something breaks. -I have used a d ring through my recovery bag to weigh down winch lines before. (The bag is nice and heavy, and it has a nice handle to make sure it stays on the line).

Thanks for posting this up David. People just need to calm down and use a little common sense instead of demonizing things just because of something they once read about on the internet a long time ago.

TreyJK
03-13-2014, 05:58 PM
Ha okay, Emperor Eddie, all great and powerful. What you just posted is exactly the kind of thing I was referring to. But since I now realize that I can't get my point across to you, keep up the good work and give Overlander a treat for being such an obedient disciple! Peace out girlscout! ✌️

munstie
03-13-2014, 06:04 PM
Ha okay, Emperor Eddie, all great and powerful. What you just posted is exactly the kind of thing I was referring to. But since I now realize that I can't get my point across to you, keep up the good work and give Overlander a treat for being such an obedient disciple! Peace out girlscout! ✌️

You sir, need to get over yourself. And once you get your head dislodged from your ass kindly find the door.....

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 06:06 PM
Ha okay, Emperor Eddie, all great and powerful. What you just posted is exactly the kind of thing I was referring to. But since I now realize that I can't get my point across to you, keep up the good work and give Overlander a treat for being such an obedient disciple! Peace out girlscout! ✌️

:yawn37: What a surprise. What you just posted is exactly the kind of thing I was referring to. You like to self-righteously dish it out but get your panties in a bunch if you don't like what you hear as a response. Keep up the good work and go back to whatever forum it is you came from. Peace out girlscout ;)

MTG
03-13-2014, 06:10 PM
Here you go trey...


73535


Seems like you need some. :thumb:

JK's JK
03-13-2014, 06:30 PM
Ha okay, Emperor Eddie, all great and powerful. What you just posted is exactly the kind of thing I was referring to. But since I now realize that I can't get my point across to you, keep up the good work and give Overlander a treat for being such an obedient disciple! Peace out girlscout! ✌️

Wow....:jaw drop: Blood suckers will make you angery..

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 06:41 PM
So that it's clear, the article I have written is just what I carry and why. I only posted it up because I get a ton of people asking me about it all the time. If you disagree with me, don't like what I have to say or think I'm stupid for carrying/using certain tools, by all means, do yourself a favor and DON'T carry or use them.

munstie
03-13-2014, 06:51 PM
So that it's clear, the article I have written is just what I carry and why. I only posted it up because I get a ton of people asking me about it all the time. If you disagree with me, don't like what I have to say or think I'm stupid for carrying/using certain tools, by all means, do yourself a favor and DON'T carry or use them.

Really don't think you need to explain anything, that guy was here to obviously stir the pot.:thumbup:

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 06:53 PM
so nobody has commented on my bubble gum trick, it must be approved :crazyeyes:

munstie
03-13-2014, 06:58 PM
so nobody has commented on my bubble gum trick, it must be approved :crazyeyes:

If that works for you fine, but I won't be trying it anytime soon. :D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

Tigrcky
03-13-2014, 07:00 PM
If that works for you fine, but I won't be trying it anytime soon. :D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

the trick is to use 500 lbs of double bubble, nothing else works

ridg3runner
03-13-2014, 07:03 PM
and give Overlander a treat for being such an obedient disciple! ️
You need a Hater count, won't be long and these trolls will run it up higher than your post count, Adam.lol


Sent from my DROID4 using WAYALIFE mobile app

Kilroy
03-13-2014, 07:24 PM
Im sure we all have seen the videos of people muuudboggin but never have i seen anything portrayed as safety in those videos. Still sad. Cant you a bubba rope instead? I have only used a bubba rope once works like a charm for a jurknpull.

hydrohut
03-13-2014, 08:52 PM
Well this thread made interesting reading! just thought on the subject of recovery some might be interested in this snatch gone wrong. All of us, always have something to learn.. hope I have posted the link correctly. http://youtu.be/f8trkgFX6wI

OverlanderJK
03-13-2014, 09:12 PM
Ha okay, Emperor Eddie, all great and powerful. What you just posted is exactly the kind of thing I was referring to. But since I now realize that I can't get my point across to you, keep up the good work and give Overlander a treat for being such an obedient disciple! Peace out girlscout! ✌️

Lol talk about an agenda. Fucking tool.

wayoflife
03-13-2014, 10:04 PM
Well this thread made interesting reading! just thought on the subject of recovery some might be interested in this snatch gone wrong. All of us, always have something to learn.. hope I have posted the link correctly. http://youtu.be/f8trkgFX6wI

Wow, I mean, just wow. There was just so much stupidness going on in the video that I don't even know where to begin. If there's one thing that I learned, people who link two straps together with a stick or a newspaper think it's okay to yank the living crap out of a stuck rig and to the point where you end up flopping the recovery rig. To that end, yeah, if that's how people are using their straps, I think they have way bigger things to worry about IN ADDITION TO a d-ring becoming a projectile.

Needless to say, not exactly how I would have done things but hey, what do I know.

Armydog
03-13-2014, 10:18 PM
What the fuck, over????

This was a friendly thread with some experienced off road-ers sharing their personal experience and free advice. Some of us appreciate this contribution to our own journey. This does not mean that we blindly accept every word as gospel truth. It is personal experience and opinion.... plain and simple. So why do some asshats take personal insult when they disagree with the opinions offered or more to the point why do they become personal when others don't agree with them???

Seriously? Eddie I don't know you at all, we have never met and may never get the chance to do so... BUT every question I have asked and every thread I have read here on YOUR forum has been received with grace and answered with sincerity. Not kissing ass here, no need to. Just the facts. You and most of your "disciples" have proven friendly, helpful and informative. Period.

So, bottom line. If someone on here is not man enough to be secure in his or her own opinions; not civil enough to allow others to politely disagree; and not intelligent enough to entertain the possibility that they might still have a few things to learn.... My advice? Go fuck yourself!

But that's just my opinion....

Back to the point of this particular thread. Here is a picture of my current recovery kit. I got the ARB recovery bag on a discount sale online... It's orange! Get it... Orange bag = Orange TJR = the Pumpkin!!!!!

73548

73549

73550

Thanks to the previous advice in this thread (before the asshat personal attacks started) I am adding the following items to this BASIC kit:
Drop chain with hooks
Folding shovel/ e tool

Any further suggestions??????? I am listening.

Tango Yankee


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

MTG
03-13-2014, 10:20 PM
Wow, I mean, just wow. There was just so much stupidness going on in the video that I don't even know where to begin. If there's one thing that I learned, people who link two straps together with a stick or a newspaper think it's okay to yank the living crap out of a stuck rig and to the point where you end up flopping the recovery rig. To that end, yeah, if that's how people are using their straps, I think they have way bigger things to worry about IN ADDITION TO a d-ring becoming a projectile.

Needless to say, not exactly how I would have done things but hey, what do I know.

I think what really saved those guys were the Australian accents. :yup:

And I don't know what they were so worried about anyway, they had snorkels? :idontknow:

TheDuff
03-13-2014, 10:23 PM
Treating recovery straps like a kinetic rope isn't too bright:what:

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Armydog
03-13-2014, 10:24 PM
I think what really saved those guys were the Australian accents. :yup:

And I don't know what they were so worried about anyway, they had snorkels? :idontknow:

They did get both rigs out in the end. And there was little damage and no injuries...... Fun to watch but not gonna try this with my rig


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TheDuff
03-13-2014, 10:27 PM
I think what really saved those guys were the Australian accents. :yup:

And I don't know what they were so worried about anyway, they had snorkels? :idontknow:

And roof racks! Would have been really funny if they had used an overland journal between the 2 straps:p:p:p

Sent from my LG-D800 using WAYALIFE mobile app

stweasel
03-13-2014, 10:27 PM
Wow, I mean, just wow. There was just so much stupidness going on in the video that I don't even know where to begin. If there's one thing that I learned, people who link two straps together with a stick or a newspaper think it's okay to yank the living crap out of a stuck rig and to the point where you end up flopping the recovery rig. To that end, yeah, if that's how people are using their straps, I think they have way bigger things to worry about IN ADDITION TO a d-ring becoming a projectile.

Needless to say, not exactly how I would have done things but hey, what do I know.

Just think how much more exciting your videos would be if Cindy made you do your shots over again. Actually if we could get Chris to agree to reshoot the driveshafts breaking.

machinegunmedic
03-13-2014, 10:53 PM
Like ArmyDog said, they did get out, and with little or no damage. So in the exact scenero and same equipment; what would you guys do different?
Ok.... and not go back the second time for the camera man doesn't count.

I've been stuck with my jeep more times than I can count, and at work we use G Wagons, so I spend my share of time in mud, snow and sand. I'm always open for new and better ideas.

Kilroy
03-13-2014, 11:01 PM
Treating recovery straps like a kinetic rope isn't too bright:what:

Sent from my LG-D800 using WAYALIFE mobile app

Ya im not a personal fan of doing that either. But if thats all you have...

GCM 2
03-14-2014, 12:05 AM
After re-reading through this whole thread I noticed a key piece of equipment that has been continually left out of the discussion. This piece of kit is intended to prevent death on the trail during recoveries, as well as preventing forum trolls from flourishing- simply known as a rope blanket

Not just used for sucking the kinetic energy out of steel cables if they should snap, but can be placed on any line, rope, etc.



73551




73552



Heck, this one even holds snatch block and clevis'


73553


Oh my, what's that? You can use your tow strap or snatch strap to also be used as a rope blanket?


73554


.......What about a large floppy floor mat, or a picnic blanket, or a sleeping bag, or a seat cover? Can these be used to to prevent a snapped recovery line with a clevis from shooting through my face?

Why yes, you F'ing tool, yes you can.

Armydog
03-14-2014, 12:07 AM
After re-reading through this whole thread I noticed a key piece of equipment that has been continually left out of the discussion. This piece of kit is intended to prevent death on the trail during recoveries, as well as preventing forum trolls from flourishing- simply known as a rope blanket

Not just used for sucking the kinetic energy out of steel cables if they should snap, but can be placed on any line, rope, etc.



73551




73552



Heck, this one even holds snatch block and clevis'


73553


Oh my, what's that? You can use your tow strap or snatch strap to also be used as a rope blanket?


73554


.......What about a large floppy floor mat, or a picnic blanket, or a sleeping bag, or a seat cover? Can these be used to to prevent a snapped recovery line with a clevis from shooting through my face?

Why yes, you F'ing tool, yes you can.

Very nice..... and it's orange!!!!!


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

Tigrcky
03-14-2014, 12:13 AM
Like ArmyDog said, they did get out, and with little or no damage. So in the exact scenero and same equipment; what would you guys do different?
Ok.... and not go back the second time for the camera man doesn't count.

I've been stuck with my jeep more times than I can count, and at work we use G Wagons, so I spend my share of time in mud, snow and sand. I'm always open for new and better ideas.

personally i would have used the winch on the unstuck taco to pull it while strapped to the other taco to pull both but thats just me

hydrohut
03-14-2014, 12:21 AM
Wow, I mean, just wow. There was just so much stupidness going on in the video that I don't even know where to begin. If there's one thing that I learned, people who link two straps together with a stick or a newspaper think it's okay to yank the living crap out of a stuck rig and to the point where you end up flopping the recovery rig. To that end, yeah, if that's how people are using their straps, I think they have way bigger things to worry about IN ADDITION TO a d-ring becoming a projectile.

Needless to say, not exactly how I would have done things but hey, what do I know.

Was just putting it out there for all to see in a friendly non offensive way. Personally, and I'm no expert on recovery, I think they didn't do a bad job in the end under the circumstances, considering the speed of the tide coming in etc, they worked very fast at getting a good final outcome. In situations like that sometimes what people do aint always pretty and not necessarily best practice. No matter how you do a snatch there is always an element of danger I think. In the end they were lucky they had that length of straps to put the tow vehicle on firm enough ground, complete the recovery and not end up with two hopelessly bogged down trucks.

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 12:38 AM
Like ArmyDog said, they did get out, and with little or no damage.

That we know of. Sure, they got away from doing body damage but, big energy like that can do significant damage to your drive train components.


So in the exact scenero and same equipment; what would you guys do different?

Well, they seemed to have enough winch line to hook up the that tree. Using the same tools, I would have anchored the recovery vehicle to that tree using the 2 straps and then used the winch to do the recovery. Sure, it would't be as dramatic on camera but, it would have been a lot safer. I should note that I have done this EXACT recovery to help rescue a Jeep sliding off a steep and loose mountain side and god forbid, I even used a d-ring to connect the 2 straps to do it :shock:

Whenever possible, I try really hard to avoid recoveries requiring hillbilly horse power but, that's just me.

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 12:40 AM
After re-reading through this whole thread I noticed a key piece of equipment that has been continually left out of the discussion. This piece of kit is intended to prevent death on the trail during recoveries, as well as preventing forum trolls from flourishing- simply known as a rope blanket

Not just used for sucking the kinetic energy out of steel cables if they should snap, but can be placed on any line, rope, etc.

.......What about a large floppy floor mat, or a picnic blanket, or a sleeping bag, or a seat cover? Can these be used to to prevent a snapped recovery line with a clevis from shooting through my face?

Why yes, you F'ing tool, yes you can.

Yup, well said. I always carry a big moving blanket with me. For the most part, it acts as a sleeping pad for Tessa but, use it all the time when working under my Jeep on the trail and if needed, use it for this very purpose. Thank you for posting this up. :yup:

munstie
03-14-2014, 12:44 AM
At least they had boats:what:

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

machinegunmedic
03-14-2014, 12:50 AM
That we know of. Sure, they got away from doing body damage but, big energy like that can do significant damage to your drive train components.



Well, they seemed to have enough winch line to hook up the that tree. Using the same tools, I would have anchored the recovery vehicle to that tree using the 2 straps and then used the winch to do the recovery. Sure, it would't be as dramatic on camera but, it would have been a lot safer. I should note that I have done this EXACT recovery to help rescue a Jeep sliding off a steep and loose mountain side and god forbid, I even used a d-ring to connect the 2 straps to do it :shock:

Whenever possible, I try really hard to avoid recoveries requiring hillbilly horse power but, that's just me.

So I would have anchored to the tree as well and used winch, however I got to thinking. The second truck was in the muck good. Would there be more energy in the winch or the old snatch and go?

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 12:51 AM
Was just putting it out there for all to see in a friendly non offensive way.

Oh, I understand that and hope you know that I was not trying to be critical of you. I was just stupefied at what I saw in the video. :crazyeyes:


Personally, and I'm no expert on recovery, I think they didn't do a bad job in the end under the circumstances, considering the speed of the tide coming in etc, they worked very fast at getting a good final outcome. In situations like that sometimes what people do aint always pretty and not necessarily best practice. No matter how you do a snatch there is always an element of danger I think.

And this is where I would disagree. In my opinion, a recovery should always be methodical and done patiently. Because they were in such a rush, one of the recovery rig ended up on it's side. Had there not been a tree nearby to help get him back on all four, they would of had two hopelessly bogged down trucks with the tide coming in. Of course, this is to say nothing of the fact that someone could have gotten seriously hurt. While there may always be an element of danger in any recovery, there are always way to mitigate them.

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 12:58 AM
At least they had boats :what:

:cheesy:


So I would have anchored to the tree as well and used winch, however I got to thinking. The second truck was in the muck good. Would there be more energy in the winch or the old snatch and go?

I suppose it depends on what kind of winch they were using. While there may have been more energy in the snatch and go method, it clearly could have lead to disaster. A little digging in front of the tires to create a ramp wouldn't have hurt either. Of course, one of the reasons why the guy got stuck in the first place was because he was running what looked to me like street pressure in his tires. Once stuck, they could have let a lot of air out and that would have helped. You just need to think things through rather than just start yanking the hell out of a stuck rig. At least, that how I try to do things.

munstie
03-14-2014, 01:04 AM
And, they would of had two hopelessly bogged down trucks with the tide coming in. .

That's why they had the boats on the racks they could've just continued flipping it over and floated it out of there.:D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

GCM 2
03-14-2014, 01:08 AM
Yup, well said. I always carry a big moving blanket with me. For the most part, it acts as a sleeping pad for Tessa but, use it all the time when working under my Jeep on the trail and if needed, use it for this very purpose. Thank you for posting this up. :yup:

Man, incredibly average minds think alike! My blue quilted moving blanket goes everywhere with me too, my dogs use it for their pad in the jeep, I use it on the trail for repairs too, and most recently it was used as my bottom insulating layer on my air mattress while I slept in the race trailer out at King of the Hammers. I think I bought it at a uhaul store for like $12.00, definitely a must have trail item I recommend to everyone!

Armydog
03-14-2014, 01:11 AM
So I would have anchored to the tree as well and used winch, however I got to thinking. The second truck was in the muck good. Would there be more energy in the winch or the old snatch and go?

Agreed on the winch. They didn't even try that. Just went right to the snatch and grab.....


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Krieger
03-14-2014, 01:28 AM
Not only do I also carry a moving blanket, I have a small piece of carpet

Armydog
03-14-2014, 01:35 AM
:cheesy:



I suppose it depends on what kind of winch they were using. While there may have been more energy in the snatch and go method, it clearly could have lead to disaster. A little digging in front of the tires to create a ramp wouldn't have hurt either. Of course, one of the reasons why the guy got stuck in the first place was because he was running what looked to me like street pressure in his tires. Once stuck, they could have let a lot of air out and that would have helped. You just need to think things through rather than just start yanking the hell out of a stuck rig. At least, that how I try to do things.

I'm just learning here, but have witnessed the incredible difference airing down makes. Tried the pumpkin in the last snow storm, made it about 100 yards uphill on a construction road that was unplowed and covered with about 35-40 inches of powder. Lost momentum (first problem) then the tires cut into the snow and the whole rig sank in up to the dropped belly pan ( another issue with my rig). Stuck. Stuck. Stuck. So, the first thing I did was air down, newby here.... went a little too low, but didn't loose the bead. Got moving again even though it took a bit of back and forth rocking.... Got about a quarter mile more uphill until I got sideways and started slipping off the retaining wall toward the parallel drainage culvert. It's about a 15' drop, so I chickened out and pulled the cable back to a tree on the opposite side of the road. Once I winched the pumpkin back on the straight and narrow, I drove out without any slippage at all... downhill of course, and I'm sure that is a factor but the lower tire pressure was definitely a factor...

Going to get some air down valves or whatever those things are called because it's slow ,tedious and inaccurate doing it by hand.
AND I need on board air so I don't have to drive home on nearly flat tires.... The road in question is 100' from my driveway.....


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Armydog
03-14-2014, 01:36 AM
Adding a moving blanket to my recovery kit............


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OverlanderJK
03-14-2014, 01:37 AM
I don't get stuck. Problem solved.

Armydog
03-14-2014, 01:44 AM
I don't get stuck. Problem solved.

Never? Really? And for the sake of argument is "temporarily immobile" considered stuck???


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munstie
03-14-2014, 02:05 AM
I don't get stuck. Problem solved.

Hard to get stuck at the mall.:D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

jkjurny
03-14-2014, 02:46 AM
Aren't you supposed to let the snatch straps rest between pulls too? Thought I read that somewhere. They need to cool down after being rapidly stretched.

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 02:51 AM
That's why they had the boats on the racks they could've just continued flipping it over and floated it out of there.:D

:cheesy: It all makes sense now :D


Man, incredibly average minds think alike! My blue quilted moving blanket goes everywhere with me too, my dogs use it for their pad in the jeep, I use it on the trail for repairs too, and most recently it was used as my bottom insulating layer on my air mattress while I slept in the race trailer out at King of the Hammers. I think I bought it at a uhaul store for like $12.00, definitely a must have trail item I recommend to everyone!

Indeed, incredibly average minds :crazyeyes: :D


I don't get stuck. Problem solved.


Hard to get stuck at the mall.

:cheesy:

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 02:52 AM
Aren't you supposed to let the snatch straps rest between pulls too? Thought I read that somewhere. They need to cool down after being rapidly stretched.

I could see that but a good strap like what ARB makes have a warning indicator that reveals itself if you've exceed the straps operational integrity.

jkjurny
03-14-2014, 02:54 AM
I could see that but a good strap like what ARB makes have a warning indicator that reveals itself if you've exceed the straps operational integrity.

Good to know! I have the orange arb snatch strap so need to look for that indicator.

wayoflife
03-14-2014, 02:58 AM
Good to know! I have the orange arb snatch strap so need to look for that indicator.

LOL!! Actually, with any luck, you'll never see it. :crazyeyes:

David1tontj
03-14-2014, 02:58 AM
So in the exact scenero and same equipment; what would you guys do different?


Like wayalife said, I would use a strap from the back of my rig to the tree to keep me from sliding, if the tree wasn't available, a wheel chock, or even a small Hole dug in front of your tires can work- then I would've used a snatch block (pulley) on my winch line making it twice as powerful and just had a slow, controlled recovery.
Accidents often happen when people get lazy, don't think of the best way to make a recovery, or don't have the proper equipment to execute the perfect recovery.

Ps- digging a small hole to pull into is one method I use often in the snow, if you don't, then the recovery rig just slides toward the stuck one.


After re-reading through this whole thread I noticed a key piece of equipment that has been continually left out of the discussion. This piece of kit is intended to prevent death on the trail during recoveries, as well as preventing forum trolls from flourishing- simply known as a rope blanket

Not just used for sucking the kinetic energy out of steel cables if they should snap, but can be placed on any line, rope, etc.



73551




73552



Heck, this one even holds snatch block and clevis'


73553


Oh my, what's that? You can use your tow strap or snatch strap to also be used as a rope blanket?


73554


.......What about a large floppy floor mat, or a picnic blanket, or a sleeping bag, or a seat cover? Can these be used to to prevent a snapped recovery line with a clevis from shooting through my face?

Why yes, you F'ing tool, yes you can.

Not the whole thread.. :)

I mentioned this in post 55 -

" And let's not forget to be draping stuff over cables to weigh them down if something breaks. -I have used a d ring through my recovery bag to weigh down winch lines before. (The bag is nice and heavy, and it has a nice handle to make sure it stays on the line) "


-I do like the idea of a moving blanket! Much better than getting a good jacket all dirty!



My ride- 2001 power wheel, 11" plastic tires, upgraded battery, boat sides, custom bumpers, tow hooks, new paint.

hydrohut
03-14-2014, 05:31 AM
And this is where I would disagree. In my opinion, a recovery should always be methodical and done patiently. Because they were in such a rush, one of the recovery rig ended up on it's side. Had there not been a tree nearby to help get him back on all four, they would of had two hopelessly bogged down trucks with the tide coming in. Of course, this is to say nothing of the fact that someone could have gotten seriously hurt. While there may always be an element of danger in any recovery, there are always way to mitigate them.

That makes a lot of sense, got to agree totally with all that. I'm glad that video seems to have generated some good sensible discussion.

OverlanderJK
03-14-2014, 06:40 AM
Why yes, you F'ing tool, yes you can.

Just saw this and it is hilarious! Good star for you today. :thumb:

mudmobeeler
03-14-2014, 03:17 PM
When I mostly had reg cab long bed 4x4s and had plenty of storage space in the bed I carried a used car tire I picked up at a local tire shop for 10 or 20 bucks. Run your strap or winch cable through the opening where the rim would be and if something where to break it should be enough weight to drop the strap or cable to the ground. Even a bald tire will work and last a long time using it for this purpose.

I also carried a 30 foot length of chain and used it plenty of times. Luckily I never expierenced a breakage with it. It's main purpose was not for pulling people or myself out however so I only used it in a last resort situation and you can bieleve it had something on it in case it did break. It also saved my butt as well as others in securing an axle and/or suspension component in the event of a break to get one off the trail. For that reason alone I now carry a 10 foot section of chain in case something needed to be chained up to get off the trail. I've seen straps and ratchet straps work for this purpose as well but seen cheaper "walmart" ones break.

Eddie just made me feel like an idiot with the moving blanket idea. I have carried a 10x10 or 10x12 blue tarp for a long time. Used it plenty of times to work under a vehicle. The heavy thicker moving blanket would probably be so much more comfortable, not move around as much when sliding in and out under a vehicle, give the dogs a blanket for laying on if needed, as well as a blanket for a human if needed, and a weight for a cable or strap! Plus being we have the four door its hard to find enough room for stuff anyways so the car tire has been setting at the house and Ive been lucky enough to not need a tug out or have pulled anybody else out. Time to add the blanket to the box, think I might need a bigger box. Lol.

mudmobeeler
03-14-2014, 03:20 PM
Forgot to add that I now have a good strap for pulling people out and not a chain. Need to get one of those ARB straps though as it will be better than what I have.

JKbrick
03-14-2014, 03:36 PM
Was just at NAPA, do these look any good?
73641
The rope, not the other stuff

GCM 2
03-14-2014, 03:50 PM
.....Not the whole thread.. :)

I mentioned this in post 55 -

" And let's not forget to be draping stuff over cables to weigh them down if something breaks. -I have used a d ring through my recovery bag to weigh down winch lines before. (The bag is nice and heavy, and it has a nice handle to make sure it stays on the line) "


-I do like the idea of a moving blanket! Much better than getting a good jacket all dirty!

.

Dear David1tontj: My apologies for not seeing your mention of using some field craft for a rope blanket! :thumb:

Now click this link for the best deals shaking on a blanket.....

http://t.harborfreight.com/material-handling/moving-supplies.html



Was just at NAPA, do these look any good?
The rope, not the other stuff

I can't say that I have ever seen one of these, but it is certinly better than nothing and would certainly work for the occassional weekend warrior who gets stuck. More than likely it's just a rebranded cheapo version that some cordage company makes. For examle, New England Ropes and American Rope Company (Both huge in the rope industry) make lots of different products for anyone, to any spec. I will say that NAPA has chosen a very badass name for it- Ditch Pig!

jkjurny
03-14-2014, 04:57 PM
Here is where I read that you need to rest your snatch/recovery straps. First "NOTE:" near the top of the page.

http://arbusa.com/Getting-Started/Recovery-Techniques-Equipment.aspx

hydrohut
03-14-2014, 09:47 PM
Here is where I read that you need to rest your snatch/recovery straps. First "NOTE:" near the top of the page.

http://arbusa.com/Getting-Started/Recovery-Techniques-Equipment.aspx

That's a good read.

4X4PLAY
03-15-2014, 02:46 AM
http://arbusa.com/Getting-Started/Recovery-Techniques-Equipment.aspx

That is a great read! :clap2: Did you happen to notice what they said "not to do when joining two straps" in "Making the Recovery".

Years and years ago when I did my trail guiding course we were given pamphlets quite similar and it was pounded into our heads before we were given an exam at the end of our training course. You either receive 100% on the exam or fail.

Off-road is extremely serious business and when it is not practiced to the book someone has the potential of becoming seriously injured or even becoming a fatality (Like I mentioned in my second post where I was completely shit on for sharing the CORRECT method of attaching two straps). Like shown here: http://www.legionlandrover.com/manuales/4wd%20recovery_how%20to%20join%20recovery%20straps .pdf and here (at bottom of page) http://www.roadrunneroffroad.com.au/Snatch-Strap-ARB-11000kg--ARB710.html

Even though I myself have a great video demonstrating the safe means of attaching two straps together I will not post a link to my video, rather than be accused of "promoting my own agenda"!! Honestly I would rather see someone learn from it and make one more trail ride safe and enjoyable rather than a fatality.
This is a great informative video I found (not mine) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JBnxSqpuCM
I could go on posting probably another dozen or two links that will tell you DO NOT ATTACH TWO STRAPS TOGETHER WITH A D-RING/CLEVIS but you all know how to research off-road safety I am sure. Actually, thinking back to the next couple pages after my post perhaps I am wrong, there wasn't much intelligence there, right ridg3runner :naw:
I seriously think Serg5000 knew better but didn't want to get shit on by Emperor Eddie's posey of minions.

Kudos to TreyJK, the only other intelligent life in this thread. you were 100% bang on and thank you for stepping up. You are a true Jeeper and wheeler and I would share a trail with you any day of the week. As for these other clowns, I sincerely hope we never share the same trail, I value the life of my friends, family and anyone else on the trail.

Eddie my friend, I seriously hope you have a disclaimer on your poor advice as I can smell a lawsuit if anyone took your advice and wound up killing their wife, child or friend due to your ignorance and the fact that you cannot admit when you are wrong. Like I said in my other post, "I was researching" because I am not about to shoot my mouth off without knowing for a fact that I am correct.

To all the other Jeepers and readers, please accept my apology as I was not intending to "stir the pot", I simply wanted to point out a very serious and lethal error in Eddie's advice.

Happy and SAFE Jeeping to all! :rock:

Regards!
Jeff

PS: JKBRICK That IS better than a strap when it comes to kinetic recovery straps/ropes, it will give you over 30% elongation in your recovery offering less chance that something will break. I would highly recommend checking out www.asroffroad.com their ropes are better priced, probably better quality and they have a kick ass 3 year no fault warranty. (Meaning if something happens to your strap in 3 years they will replace it for the cost of shipping, even if you cut it yourself by accident!) I highly recommend them!! But what do I know?? :idontknow:

PSS: I am sure this post will be deleted... Eddie, where's that door you spoke of?? :standing wave:

10frank9
03-15-2014, 02:56 AM
That is a great read! :clap2: Did you happen to notice what they said "not to do when joining two straps" in "Making the Recovery".

Years and years ago when I did my trail guiding course we were given pamphlets quite similar and it was pounded into our heads before we were given an exam at the end of our training course. You either receive 100% on the exam or fail.

Off-road is extremely serious business and when it is not practiced to the book someone has the potential of becoming seriously injured or even becoming a fatality (Like I mentioned in my second post where I was completely shit on for sharing the CORRECT method of attaching two straps). Like shown here: http://www.legionlandrover.com/manuales/4wd%20recovery_how%20to%20join%20recovery%20straps .pdf and here (at bottom of page) http://www.roadrunneroffroad.com.au/Snatch-Strap-ARB-11000kg--ARB710.html

Even though I myself have a great video demonstrating the safe means of attaching two straps together I will not post a link to my video, rather than be accused of "promoting my own agenda"!! Honestly I would rather see someone learn from it and make one more trail ride safe and enjoyable rather than a fatality.
This is a great informative video I found (not mine) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JBnxSqpuCM
I could go on posting probably another dozen or two links that will tell you DO NOT ATTACH TWO STRAPS TOGETHER WITH A D-RING/CLEVIS but you all know how to research off-road safety I am sure. Actually, thinking back to the next couple pages after my post perhaps I am wrong, there wasn't much intelligence there, right ridg3runner :naw:
I seriously think Serg5000 knew better but didn't want to get shit on by Emperor Eddie's posey of minions.

Kudos to TreyJK, the only other intelligent life in this thread. you were 100% bang on and thank you for stepping up. You are a true Jeeper and wheeler and I would share a trail with you any day of the week. As for these other clowns, I sincerely hope we never share the same trail, I value the life of my friends, family and anyone else on the trail.

Eddie my friend, I seriously hope you have a disclaimer on your poor advice as I can smell a lawsuit if anyone took your advice and wound up killing their wife, child or friend due to your ignorance and the fact that you cannot admit when you are wrong. Like I said in my other post, "I was researching" because I am not about to shoot my mouth off without knowing for a fact that I am correct.

To all the other Jeepers and readers, please accept my apology as I was not intending to "stir the pot", I simply wanted to point out a very serious and lethal error in Eddie's advice.

Happy and SAFE Jeeping to all! :rock:

Regards!
Jeff

PS: JKBRICK That IS better than a strap when it comes to kinetic recovery straps/ropes, it will give you over 30% elongation in your recovery offering less chance that something will break. I would highly recommend checking out www.asroffroad.com their ropes are better priced, probably better quality and they have a kick ass 3 year no fault warranty. (Meaning if something happens to your strap in 3 years they will replace it for the cost of shipping, even if you cut it yourself by accident!) I highly recommend them!! But what do I know?? :idontknow:

PSS: I am sure this post will be deleted... Eddie, where's that door you spoke of?? :standing wave:

No your post won't get deleted. But thanks for sharing your infinite knowledge. I can't believe you're still here, honestly. But what do I know I'm just a minion...... Good evening Jeffrey! You're sofa king cool!!!! :yup:

MTG
03-15-2014, 03:02 AM
That is a great read! :clap2:


Blah, blah, blah...





TLDR

Hey Jeff, incidentally do you know where I could score a good deal on a pith helmet? :idontknow:

ttfhell
03-15-2014, 03:02 AM
Congrats on letting the internet get to you! You must of threw that together in 2-3 minutes lol👍👍

Robar
03-15-2014, 03:08 AM
Congrats on letting the internet get to you! You must of threw that together in 2-3 minutes lol
He's had two days to strategically plan this rebuttal. He probably typed it and retyped it several times after having it edited by someone else. :yawn37:

10frank9
03-15-2014, 03:10 AM
1. 4x4play need his own thread

2. He is still logged on, must be waiting for Emperor Eddie to respond

3. I'm no detective but anyone who signs up with a screen name of 4 by foreplay has to be a "serious wheeler"

OverlanderJK
03-15-2014, 03:12 AM
1. 4x4play need his own thread

2. He is still logged on, must be waiting for Emperor Eddie to respond

3. I'm no detective but anyone who signs up with a screen name of 4 by foreplay has to be a "serious wheeler"

He is a troll. Trying to get a rise out of people here since he can't get a rise out of himself and his shitty life.

Armydog
03-15-2014, 03:13 AM
On a side note, I got 20' of chain today. Going to pick up some hooks at granger and throw it in the back of the pumpkin. Thought about hanging it around the front bumper but that would be way to redneck and the chain would get nasty and rusty... so in the recovery bag it will go.....


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

10frank9
03-15-2014, 03:14 AM
On a side note, I got 20' of chain today. Going to pick up some hooks at granger and throw it in the back of the pumpkin. Thought about hanging it around the front bumper but that would be way to redneck and the chain would get nasty and rusty... so in the recovery bag it will go.....


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

Get any D rings to use when pulling using 2 straps? :cheesy:

Tigrcky
03-15-2014, 03:17 AM
http://www.legionlandrover.com/manuales/4wd%20recovery_how%20to%20join%20recovery%20straps .pdf[/url] [B]


Kudos to TreyJK, the only other intelligent life in this thread. you were 100% bang on and thank you for stepping up. You are a true Jeeper and wheeler and I would share a trail with you any day of the week. As for these other clowns, I sincerely hope we never share the same trail, I value the life of my friends, family and anyone else on the trail.



To all the other Jeepers and readers, please accept my apology as I was not intending to "stir the pot", I simply wanted to point out a very serious and lethal error in Eddie's advice.


Eddie, where's that door you spoke of?? :standing wave:

ok first off the 3 picture mentioned in your first link is used by mountain rescue teams all over to SAVE lives, and its actually only different then the 4th picture because the end straps are looped and stitched, that knot is not hard to remove, you just have to have some brains...

2nd line you dont know anyone here so how can you judge our wheeling abilities or rescue techniques?

3rd line quoted you are stirring the pot with your ridiculous assumptions about others here

4th line quoted use the door but be sure you dont let it hit your ass on the way out.

i found a nice photo that describes you nicely as well!!!

73728

Robar
03-15-2014, 03:18 AM
3. I'm no detective but anyone who signs up with a screen name of 4 by foreplay has to be a "serious wheeler"
Sounds more like a want-to-be porn star.

Tigrcky
03-15-2014, 03:20 AM
1. 4x4play need his own thread

2. He is still logged on, must be waiting for Emperor Eddie to respond

3. I'm no detective but anyone who signs up with a screen name of 4 by foreplay has to be a "serious wheeler"


He is a troll. Trying to get a rise out of people here since he can't get a rise out of himself and his shitty life.

i just wanna say its times like these that i really love you two!!! hey lets go tie some square knots into some walmart recovery straps!:cheesy:

10frank9
03-15-2014, 03:20 AM
Sounds more like a want-to-be porn star.

Wanna-be is right. What I'm saying is his name screams troll. Anybody remember the assclown who signed up with the screen name "Rape"? Yeah.

munstie
03-15-2014, 03:22 AM
Bet ya he's an engineer.:D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 03:28 AM
Years and years ago when I did my trail guiding course we were given pamphlets quite similar and it was pounded into our heads before we were given an exam at the end of our training course. You either receive 100% on the exam or fail.

Seriously? There are actually "trail guiding" courses you can take where you're given "pamphlets" and you either received 100% on the exam or failed?? So, did you pass? :idontknow:


That is a great read! :clap2: Did you happen to notice what they said "not to do when joining two straps" in "Making the Recovery".

Off-road is extremely serious business and when it is not practiced to the book someone has the potential of becoming seriously injured or even becoming a fatality (Like I mentioned in my second post where I was completely shit on for sharing the CORRECT method of attaching two straps). Like shown here: http://www.legionlandrover.com/manuales/4wd%20recovery_how%20to%20join%20recovery%20straps .pdf and here (at bottom of page) http://www.roadrunneroffroad.com.au/Snatch-Strap-ARB-11000kg--ARB710.html

Oh, I get it, you're one of them overlander types that do a lot of reading on the internet, watch videos and take courses so that you can pat yourself on the back, pretend like you actually have real experience and self-righteously criticize others for things you have no real clue about. :thumb:


Even though I myself have a great video demonstrating the safe means of attaching two straps together I will not post a link to my video, rather than be accused of "promoting my own agenda"!! Honestly I would rather see someone learn from it and make one more trail ride safe and enjoyable rather than a fatality.

Well of course it was great. I mean, you made it so it has to be, right?


This is a great informative video I found (not mine) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JBnxSqpuCM
I could go on posting probably another dozen or two links that will tell you DO NOT ATTACH TWO STRAPS TOGETHER WITH A D-RING/CLEVIS but you all know how to research off-road safety I am sure.

What can I say, if it's on YouTube, it has to be right and I have to be wrong. :grayno:


Actually, thinking back to the next couple pages after my post perhaps I am wrong, there wasn't much intelligence there, right ridg3runner :naw:
I seriously think Serg5000 knew better but didn't want to get shit on by Emperor Eddie's posey of minions.

Kudos to TreyJK, the only other intelligent life in this thread. you were 100% bang on and thank you for stepping up. You are a true Jeeper and wheeler and I would share a trail with you any day of the week. As for these other clowns, I sincerely hope we never share the same trail, I value the life of my friends, family and anyone else on the trail.

Funny how if people agree with me, they are "clowns" and "minions" but if people agree with you, they get kudos and are true Jeepers and wheelers. :thinking:


Eddie my friend, I seriously hope you have a disclaimer on your poor advice as I can smell a lawsuit if anyone took your advice and wound up killing their wife, child or friend due to your ignorance and the fact that you cannot admit when you are wrong. Like I said in my other post, "I was researching" because I am not about to shoot my mouth off without knowing for a fact that I am correct.

But, why would you need to research anything being that you've already taken a course where you got pamphlets. Does this mean you failed and you were doing research so that you could get 100% the next time around? :idontknow:


To all the other Jeepers and readers, please accept my apology as I was not intending to "stir the pot", I simply wanted to point out a very serious and lethal error in Eddie's advice.

Funny, I thought you were here to do research. :thinking:


PSS: I am sure this post will be deleted... Eddie, where's that door you spoke of?? :standing wave:

:eek: Imagine that.... your post is still here. Maybe I can send you a pamphlet on how things work around here :yup:

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 03:31 AM
Sounds more like a want-to-be porn star.

:cheesy: Honestly, when I read that, I was thinking the same thing :crazyeyes: :D


Bet ya he's an engineer.:D

:cheesy: Well, he did take a "course" where he got a pamphlet. :yup:

munstie
03-15-2014, 03:33 AM
:cheesy: Honestly, when I read that, I was thinking the same thing :crazyeyes: :D



:cheesy: Well, he did take a "course" where he got a pamphlet. :yup:

And probably had to print out the certificate online.:D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

Tigrcky
03-15-2014, 03:36 AM
And probably had to print out the certificate online.:D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

wait you can do that????? damn i guess i get to be an engineer after all!! :wings::wings::wings::wings:

machinegunmedic
03-15-2014, 02:02 PM
Was just at NAPA, do these look any good?
73641
The rope, not the other stuff

I have one similar made by Master Pull called Super Yanker. Good piece of kit.

machinegunmedic
03-15-2014, 02:13 PM
I don't know if I should have started this on a new thread, this one has gone a little south. However it has to do with my original question on recovery. I broke my steel line last fall pulling a friend out and replaced it with Masterpull synthetic. I put it on the drum nice and tight and thought I did a good job however..... I tried to walk line out last week and it wouldn't budge. I had to power line out. Has anyone had problems with synthetic line free spooling? Could it be the extreme cold we were having? I found that the line would bite down on the line underneath it more so than wire. The winch and line are covered from the elements so I don't think it was moisture problem freezing line etc.

Armydog
03-15-2014, 02:23 PM
I don't know if I should have started this on a new thread, this one has gone a little south. However it has to do with my original question on recovery. I broke my steel line last fall pulling a friend out and replaced it with Masterpull synthetic. I put it on the drum nice and tight and thought I did a good job however..... I tried to walk line out last week and it wouldn't budge. I had to power line out. Has anyone had problems with synthetic line free spooling? Could it be the extreme cold we were having? I found that the line would bite down on the line underneath it more so than wire. The winch and line are covered from the elements so I don't think it was moisture problem freezing line etc.

Good question. Planning a switch to synthetic and will watch for replies....


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 02:35 PM
I don't know if I should have started this on a new thread, this one has gone a little south. However it has to do with my original question on recovery. I broke my steel line last fall pulling a friend out and replaced it with Masterpull synthetic. I put it on the drum nice and tight and thought I did a good job however..... I tried to walk line out last week and it wouldn't budge. I had to power line out. Has anyone had problems with synthetic line free spooling? Could it be the extreme cold we were having? I found that the line would bite down on the line underneath it more so than wire. The winch and line are covered from the elements so I don't think it was moisture problem freezing line etc.

Okay, here's another one that people who take courses and get pamphlets will say that I'm wrong about and ya'll can take it for whatever it's worth.

1. Attach your synthetic line to the drum and then wind it in nice and neat orderly lines for at least 10 loop or even better, until the drum is completely lined.
2. Apply a 6"-12" piece of duct tape lengthwise along the line from the drum out. This will help you to know that you are at the limit of what is safe to let out.
3. From here, continue winding in your line but NOT in neat orderly lines but rather, at an angle so that as you work your way back and forth, the line will be crisscrossed.

While this will not look as pretty, it will prevent your line from biting down through the wraps.

Please note, I have not taken any courses, have not gotten any pamphlets and certainly have not taken an exam where you either pass 100% or fail. This is just something that I've learned over the years. You can take it or leave it. :yup:

machinegunmedic
03-15-2014, 02:55 PM
Okay, here's another one that people who take courses and get pamphlets will say that I'm wrong about and ya'll can take it for whatever it's worth.

1. Attach your synthetic line to the drum and then wind it in nice and neat orderly lines for at least 10 loop or even better, until the drum is completely lined.
2. Apply a 6"-12" piece of duct tape lengthwise along the line from the drum out. This will help you to know that you are at the limit of what is safe to let out.
3. From here, continue winding in your line but NOT in neat orderly lines but rather, at an angle so that as you work your way back and forth, the line will be crisscrossed.

While this will not look as pretty, it will prevent your line from biting down through the wraps.

Please note, I have not taken any courses, have not gotten any pamphlets and certainly have not taken an exam where you either pass 100% or fail. This is just something that I've learned over the years. You can take it or leave it. :yup:

Thanks Eddie. My line on the drum has a 'heat sheath' on the first line so I will for go the duct tape. This also serves as my visual. However I'm going to try the criss cross method. I would like a certificate upon completion for Recovery 101!

God I just got sucked in, didn't I.

Armydog
03-15-2014, 02:55 PM
Okay, here's another one that people who take courses and get pamphlets will say that I'm wrong about and ya'll can take it for whatever it's worth.

1. Attach your synthetic line to the drum and then wind it in nice and neat orderly lines for at least 10 loop or even better, until the drum is completely lined.
2. Apply a 6"-12" piece of duct tape lengthwise along the line from the drum out. This will help you to know that you are at the limit of what is safe to let out.
3. From here, continue winding in your line but NOT in neat orderly lines but rather, at an angle so that as you work your way back and forth, the line will be crisscrossed.

While this will not look as pretty, it will prevent your line from biting down through the wraps.

Please note, I have not taken any courses, have not gotten any pamphlets and certainly have not taken an exam where you either pass 100% or fail. This is just something that I've learned over the years. You can take it or leave it. :yup:

So, a single layer of line laid straight side by side (traditional wrap), mark that spot and criss cross the rest to keep them from sinking into each other. Interesting.


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

Robar
03-15-2014, 03:41 PM
Ok ok. Now, no one here has any excuse to not have a certificate. Just type your name on the line and print it out.

73792

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 03:43 PM
Ok ok. Now, no one here has any excuse to not have a certificate. Just type your name on the line and print it out.

73792

Can I have one too :shock: :wings: :crazyeyes: :D

Robar
03-15-2014, 03:45 PM
Can I have one too :shock: :wings: :crazyeyes: :D
Absolutely. Everyone passes and can have a certificate. :thumb:

PS: Sorry, but I didn't make any pamphlets.

Armydog
03-15-2014, 03:53 PM
Ok ok. Now, no one here has any excuse to not have a certificate. Just type your name on the line and print it out.

73792

Who is Mr Glennon?


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

Armydog
03-15-2014, 03:54 PM
So.......

To beat a dying horse.... Chain is in the bag! Just need a moving blanket and an e- tool

I'll keep ya'll posted


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 03:59 PM
Absolutely. Everyone passes and can have a certificate. :thumb:

PS: Sorry, but I didn't make any pamphlets.

Oh, well what good is a certificate if you don't have a pamphlet :rolleyes2: :crazyeyes: :cheesy:


So.......

To beat a dying horse.... Chain is in the bag! Just need a moving blanket and an e- tool

I'll keep ya'll posted

Yup, moving blanket is what I carry and it serves a lot of different purposes. A short chain is nice to have as it'll help give you recovery and trail fix options that you wouldn't otherwise have.

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 04:19 PM
BTW, here is an example of how a short chain can help with a recovery. After one of the guys in our group broke his 3-link rear axle mount, there was nothing to keep the pinion from shooting straight up. Unfortunately, the yoke ended up jamming up against the gas tank skid and was near impossible to free. At first, we used the winch on the Jeep itself to hold it in place while a 2nd winch from behind tried pulling the yoke down but, that wasn't enough to do the job. The only way we were going to free it was by using a 3rd winch to pull it down from the front but there was no way to safely get a tow hook or d-ring secured safely to it. Fortunately, I had my short chain with me and it allowed me to do this...

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=359350

As is the case with anything that can become a deadly projectile, it is important to be aware of it, take steps to mitigate the dangers and ONLY use it for slow, calculated pulling. NEVER uses things like this where hillbilly horsepower is required.

Again, I have not taken any courses and have not read any pamphlets so please, take what I say and show for whatever they are worth.

Robar
03-15-2014, 04:25 PM
Who is Mr Glennon?


Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app.......
Who cares? He's giving out awesome certificates.



Oh, well what good is a certificate if you don't have a pamphlet :rolleyes2: :crazyeyes: :cheesy:

Well poop. I tried.

munstie
03-15-2014, 04:26 PM
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=359350



Again, I have not taken any courses and have not read any pamphlets so please, take what I say and show for whatever they are worth.

A chain and a D ring, Damn you're daring...:D

Sent from the"Zone of Influence"

13gecko
03-15-2014, 04:29 PM
Ok ok. Now, no one here has any excuse to not have a certificate. Just type your name on the line and print it out.

73792

Guess the guys on all the JKX's didn't get these? What a shame...all that mall crawling and no certificate?!! Pshh :D:D:D

wayoflife
03-15-2014, 04:30 PM
Who cares? He's giving out awesome certificates.

Well poop. I tried.

Well, I'll give you an A+ for effort then. After all, his certificate is indeed awesome. I feel safer already just by looking at it. :yup:


A chain and a D ring, Damn your daring...:D

Daring? I don't know, I think some would say that I'm just ignorant or flat out stupid. I'm sure if I had taken a course and read a pamphlet, I would have known of a better way to make this recovery possible. :crazyeyes:

Tigrcky
03-15-2014, 04:38 PM
Absolutely. Everyone passes and can have a certificate. :thumb:

PS: Sorry, but I didn't make any pamphlets.

even i pass?:thinking::idontknow:

David1tontj
03-15-2014, 05:12 PM
]

As is the case with anything that can become a deadly projectile, it is important to be aware of it, take steps to mitigate the dangers and ONLY use it for slow, calculated pulling. NEVER uses things like this where hillbilly horsepower is required

I think this exact way, and I think that this is the major point that everyone on here keeps missing.

If something requires more than a simple tug, then in my opinion the winch needs to come out to keep things safe.

It's never good when someone needs to rev up the recovery rig and dump the clutch!


My ride- 2001 power wheel, 11" plastic tires, upgraded battery, boat sides, custom bumpers, tow hooks, new paint.

NFRs2000NYC
10-28-2014, 11:31 PM
Just wanted to possibly add to this thread....watching the earlier video of the aussies tipping over the recovery vehicle, it seems to me they were using the wrong tool for the job. What they should have been using is the same kind of rope they used on the Top Gear polar special, the stretchy bungie stuff made to SNATCH. The strap they used in the video seems to be a tow strap, something I don't believe you should use for snatching, as the line is too solid and presents massive shock to the vehicles, the tow points, and the strap itself. Having said that, I am a noob and have not done nearly as many recoveries as most here, just some things I picked up over the last few years.

Sharkey
10-28-2014, 11:43 PM
I haven't watched the video, but I would NEVER use a static line (tow strap or chain) for a pull where momentum was required. Doing so is asking for vehicle damage and in some cases personal injury. If you are using slack and getting momentum, you need to be using a dynamic (snatch) strap or rope. The entire purpose is to stretch the dynamic line which will then hopefully free the stuck vehicle when the dynamic line contracts after the stretch.

Scoop315
03-23-2015, 11:55 PM
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322492
If there's one question I get asked all the time from new Jeepers it's, “what’s the first mod I should do to my Jeep?” And, my answer to them is always the same, “recovery gear”. Fact of the matter is, whether you’re new to the world of off-roading with a right off the show room floor stock Jeep, or a long time veteran with a highly modified built up trail rig, everyone gets into a jam sooner or later.

Tow Points
At the top of the list of things that every Jeeper should have, it's tow hooks, D-ring mounts or some kind of recovery point (like a hitch receiver) on the front and rear of their Jeep. A good tow hook or recovery point will bolt directly to your Jeep’s frame or to an aftermarket heavy duty steel bumper that's been reinforced to act as a frame crossmember. Without this basic and very affordable modification to your Jeep, you won’t be able to help anybody get out of a jam let alone get yourself out if needed.

Factory Jeep JK Wrangler Tow Hook
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=1042

Universal Hitch Receiver Shackle
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322522


Tow Strap
Now, a tow point is pretty useless without if you don't have anything to pull or be pulled with and so, the next piece of recovery that every Jeeper should have with them at all times is a tow strap. A good tow strap should be at least 20-30 feet long, have NO metal hooks or clips on it (these are extremely dangerous and should never be used) and has a pulling capacity about twice the weight of your Jeep. In the case of something like a Jeep JK Wrangler Unlimited which weighs a little over 5,000 lbs., I would recommend a strap that has a breaking strength rating of least 10,000 lbs. or more. For me, I use a 30 ft. ARB Snatch Strap that has a 100% nylon webbing construction, reinforced eyes, a genuine stretch of 20%, and a breaking strength of 8,000 kg or 17,640 lbs., basically, more than enough for a big heavy built up Jeep JK Wrangler Unlimited. What I like about the ARB Snatch Straps is that they come with a unique safety warning indicator built into them and signals you if your strap ever gets overloaded. Of course, any strap that meets the grade is better than nothing.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322510


Tree Saver
In addition to a tow strap, I would highly recommend that you get and carry a tree saver as well. Similar to a tow strap, a good tree saver will be a lot shorter and, as it’s name suggests, is used to wrap around trees that you intend to use as an anchor point. Doing this will help protect the tree from the kind of severe damage that can occur from wrapping a winch cable or recovery chain directly to it. For my purposes, I carry an ARB Tree Truck Protector which has a 3″ webbing made out of 100% polyester and has a breaking strenght of 12000kg/26,000 lbs.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322516


D-Ring Shackles
Because they are extremely strong and can be separated with ease, a good pair of 3/4" D-Ring shackles is a must have in any recovery bag. D-Ring shackles are great for safely linking tow straps together, securing a snatch block to an ARB Tree Trunk Protector and they will give you more options when helping to recover another vehicle or when getting the help from them.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322498


Snatch Block
For those of you who have a winch, I would highly recommend that you carry a good snatch block. Essentially a big pulley, a snatch block will allow you to double your winch's capacity if more pulling power is needed and, give you more winching options as well. Attached to a fixed point like a tree or vehicle, you can also use a snatch block as a vector point to triangulate your pull. This option can be especially useful in areas that are difficult to find solid ground or where obsticals and/or terrain prevent you from establishing a safe straight pull.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322495


Recovery Chain
While it wouldn't be my first choice of things to use, I do carry a short heavy duty recovery chain as it will offer more options when helping to recover a vehicle that has no tow hooks or built in tow points. In a situation like this, a chain can be hooked or wrapped around a secure part of a vehicles frame and then be used as a tow point.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322501


Gloves
A good pair of leather gloves is something everyone should carry especially if you’re still running a steel wire rope on your winch. Gloves do a great job of helping you to have a better grip on your equipment, protect your hands from rope burns and help prevent steel splinters from lancing you when handling wire winch rope.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322519


Shovel
Sometimes, the smartest way to get yourself out of a jam is to just do a little digging and because of this, I always carry a small collapsable shovel with me. It may not be the most effective tool but, it's better than using your hands.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322504


Recovery Bag
Last but not least, having something to carry all your recovery gear is in my opinion, a must. If you can keep everything together and in one bag or container, it'll make it easier for you to remember to pack in your Jeep and ensure you always have it with you.

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=322528


Recovery gear is an investment that every Jeeper should make. Isn't just a good idea to have, it's often required equipment on most organized runs and one that I can almost guarantee will pay for itself time and time again. :yup:
I'm a bit late to this thread but... Best post ever.

I haven't read through the whole thread, but I always kept a 2 ton come along in my old CJ5 and Bronco. With shackles and nylon or Kevlar straps, you can get another needed angle to get free of a bad situation.

One thing I'm thinking of adding to the collection is a winch on the rear receiver for the hitch. I'm thinking that it's portable enough to be able to store in the vehicle if I want to pull any kind of trailer, and have an extra option to go along with a winch in the front bumper.

Scoop315
03-24-2015, 02:04 AM
Here is where I read that you need to rest your snatch/recovery straps. First "NOTE:" near the top of the page.

http://arbusa.com/Getting-Started/Recovery-Techniques-Equipment.aspx
They say to back off the pin of the shackle, intending for it to not over tighten. In construction rigging, that's something that is frowned upon. If you really need to undo the pin, keep a small spud wrench. The tapered end will fit in the eye of the pin, so you can remove it. An adjustable spud wrench is like the Swiss Army knife of wrench spew, too.

bruggymonster
04-14-2015, 03:32 PM
Does anyone use those orange traction boards during winter or when in the mud? If so are they worth the investment? Also how do you guys mount them/ carry them in/ on your jeep?

Armydog
06-04-2015, 03:58 AM
Does anyone use those orange traction boards during winter or when in the mud? If so are they worth the investment? Also how do you guys mount them/ carry them in/ on your jeep?

I have a set of ARB traction aids. I think that is what you are talking about. I have not used them and simply through them in the back. Got them late last winter and didn't get to use them, but maybe I can try them out in the mud this spring....... I'll post some pictures if I do.

bruggymonster
06-04-2015, 04:18 AM
I have a set of ARB traction aids. I think that is what you are talking about. I have not used them and simply through them in the back. Got them late last winter and didn't get to use them, but maybe I can try them out in the mud this spring....... I'll post some pictures if I do.

Yeah that would be nice! I think there are some called Maxtrax but I just didn't know if they are actually worth it. It'll be interesting to see how the ARB ones work out!

IceColdJK
06-05-2015, 10:04 PM
As a complete noob I MUST agree with (I believe ArmyDog's) post where it was mentioned that this forum has be kind to the newer and less experienced Jeepers and the admins have shown nothing but respect in there answers until someone pipes up with absolute law (from pamphlets, courses, or YouTube). There is no replacing safety; Period. If common sense were truly common then, there would be more of it; Period. All of this said the advice to have a recovery kit in your rig is priceless. What you choose to put in your kit and use is your choice, but it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. This forum is also a place to read advice and other people's experiences. What someone does with the information gained from this forum is that person's own responsibility.

Personally I am going to buy a recovery kit that includes a chain. I am glad to have learned about the moving blanket too. I have never looked at one as a multi-tool before. Thank you for allow us to speak our minds here

KrawlerJK
06-18-2015, 05:28 AM
This is interesting...

http://store.arbusa.com/Bushranger-X-Jack-Complete-Kit-72X10-P3589.aspx

KrawlerJK
06-18-2015, 05:55 AM
Also was a little surprised to not see more duct tape references in this thread! I once had to do a hillbilly recovery using only weaved duct tape! No D ring required! Suffice to say a tow strap would have helped!

WJCO
01-05-2016, 03:13 AM
Four Wheeler magazine just posted an online article regarding recovery that I found worthy of sharing.

http://www.fourwheeler.com/how-to/tech-qa/1601-top-10-trail-recovery-no-nos/

WarriorJeep
01-05-2016, 03:29 AM
Before I retired i was a practicing Board Certified Physicians Assistant specializing in emergency medicine and over the course of perhaps 10 years I treated more serious and sometimes critical injuries from the improper use of recovery gear, to include several occurrences involving broken hooks on tow straps. One actually proved fatal.
Another thing I saw more than once was injuries involving synthetic winch line, specifically in the winter when the line was partially frozen.

Please be safe, and remember no object like a jeep is worth your life or limb

Arizona
01-05-2016, 01:10 PM
I enjoyed that four wheeler article. Good stuff all around!

Jhinds7253
01-05-2016, 03:54 PM
Four Wheeler magazine just posted an online article regarding recovery that I found worthy of sharing.

http://www.fourwheeler.com/how-to/tech-qa/1601-top-10-trail-recovery-no-nos/
This was very informative

JKGirl
01-05-2016, 08:19 PM
Great article particularly for a newbie such as myself.

notnalc68
01-06-2016, 12:38 AM
Nice article. Thanks, Eddie.

Journeyman
01-06-2016, 02:12 AM
Great article! I agree with everything.... BUT



Linking two straps together with a d-ring is extremely dangerous and is cause for more than one wheeling death over the years. Two straps should NEVER be put together using a d-ring, if that strap was to come off the tow point or if a strap was to break that d-ring is going to become a projectile potentially killing someone if it hits them! Google it, I am sure you will find stories!

The best way to put two straps together is with a wooden dowel or stick, hell even a newspaper stuck in between will work ;)


Happy and SAFE wheeling!
Jeff

WTF! The roap or strap your using can become a projectile! If jurked hard enough and broken. The majority of my career is revolved around rigging. Picking and pulling loads from any angle an sometimes many blocks with multable parts of line to gain mechanical advantage and I can assure you we never put a piece of wood or newspaper to link two straps together my friend. Of course you can do anything in a bind but that is deadly advice!
Hmmm let me see should I use this 3/4" shackle that I've got to that's rated at roughly 5 tons (can't exactly remember off the top of my head but it says on the shackle) or ya know fuck it I'm gonna use this branch that I found here on the trail to attach these two fiber slings together.

notnalc68
01-07-2016, 04:06 AM
What about a high lift Jack? Anyone find that necessary?

colo dean
01-07-2016, 04:52 AM
Have a couple noob questions. Back a ways, it was mentioned to criss cross the rope while winding it on the winch (after the first layer). Is that only for synthetic rope or wire too? Hopefully will be getting a winch before long. I know it has to be wound under a load. Most likely will be getting steel rope due to funds unless I can work synthetic into the budget and wondered what the proper way to wind it up would be.
Thanks.

DWiggles
01-07-2016, 03:09 PM
Have a couple noob questions. Back a ways, it was mentioned to criss cross the rope while winding it on the winch (after the first layer). Is that only for synthetic rope or wire too? Hopefully will be getting a winch before long. I know it has to be wound under a load. Most likely will be getting steel rope due to funds unless I can work synthetic into the budget and wondered what the proper way to wind it up would be.
Thanks.

Synthetic ONLY, if you criss-cross steel cable, the cable WILL kink and pinch, greatly increasing the likelihood of failure.

for Clarity

Steel cable should only be spooled nice and neat, row by row.

colo dean
01-07-2016, 03:27 PM
Roger that, thanks for the clarification.

wayoflife
01-07-2016, 03:45 PM
What about a high lift Jack? Anyone find that necessary?

"Necessary"? No. That's why it's not on the list.

Tumbleweed
01-07-2016, 05:18 PM
WTF! The roap or strap your using can become a projectile! If jurked hard enough and broken. The majority of my career is revolved around rigging. Picking and pulling loads from any angle an sometimes many blocks with multable parts of line to gain mechanical advantage and I can assure you we never put a piece of wood or newspaper to link two straps together my friend. Of course you can do anything in a bind but that is deadly advice!
Hmmm let me see should I use this 3/4" shackle that I've got to that's rated at roughly 5 tons (can't exactly remember off the top of my head but it says on the shackle) or ya know fuck it I'm gonna use this branch that I found here on the trail to attach these two fiber slings together.

I believe this is the method that was suggested to use. The limb, magazine or better yet, a rolled up towel, goes between the loops of 2 recovery straps. Merely to facilitate separating them when you are finished.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjD4t_CmZjKAhXC1CYKHaR5CyoQFggrMAM&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.4x4adventureclub.com.au%2Fdow nloads%2F4wd%2520recovery_how%2520to%2520join%2520 recovery%2520straps.pdf&usg=AFQjCNEeecQj9vbx95HGy6qgxiURhdu0SQ

notnalc68
01-07-2016, 08:19 PM
"Necessary"? No. That's why it's not on the list.

Good deal. Thx!

GraniteCrystal
01-07-2016, 08:59 PM
What about a high lift Jack? Anyone find that necessary?

I used to want one of those. I did some research and realized I probably shouldn't get one till I have some teach me, in person, how to properly use it. Those things can be pretty dangerous from what I read.

WJCO
01-07-2016, 09:03 PM
I used to want one of those. I did some research and realized I probably shouldn't get one till I have some teach me, in person, how to properly use it. Those things can be pretty dangerous from what I read.

They are dangerous, but they're simple to use, IMO. But at the same time, rarely used on the trail from my experience. I've used mine more for fixing crap around the house, etc than actual trail use. I had to squeeze two bent brackets together on my dishwasher hinges not too long ago and it was the perfect tool for the job!

notnalc68
01-07-2016, 09:34 PM
I used to want one of those. I did some research and realized I probably shouldn't get one till I have some teach me, in person, how to properly use it. Those things can be pretty dangerous from what I read.

Tell me about it. My dad had one that was bent as long as I can remember, he was still using it.

CJW
01-07-2016, 10:22 PM
Okay, here's another one that people who take courses and get pamphlets will say that I'm wrong about and ya'll can take it for whatever it's worth.

1. Attach your synthetic line to the drum and then wind it in nice and neat orderly lines for at least 10 loop or even better, until the drum is completely lined.
2. Apply a 6"-12" piece of duct tape lengthwise along the line from the drum out. This will help you to know that you are at the limit of what is safe to let out.
3. From here, continue winding in your line but NOT in neat orderly lines but rather, at an angle so that as you work your way back and forth, the line will be crisscrossed.

While this will not look as pretty, it will prevent your line from biting down through the wraps.

Please note, I have not taken any courses, have not gotten any pamphlets and certainly have not taken an exam where you either pass 100% or fail. This is just something that I've learned over the years. You can take it or leave it. :yup:

Would you recommend the same for a steel line or instead keep it neat and orderly?

GraniteCrystal
01-07-2016, 10:49 PM
Would you recommend the same for a steel line or instead keep it neat and orderly?

See question and answer above. Already been asked.

CJW
01-08-2016, 05:07 AM
See question and answer above. Already been asked.

You're right. Thanks! Overlooked that.

PokerStogey
05-22-2016, 04:32 AM
Outstanding thread for a noob such as myself... much appreciated!

Tincup
08-04-2016, 08:42 PM
I just got my warn heavy-duty winching accessory kit from Warn yesterday instead of the white/grey glove i got the new black ones :thumb: . They had a mail in rebate with purchase of warn winch :thumb:

just need to get a winch damper and recovery strap.

time to practice with the items to familiarize myself with them.

GraniteCrystal
08-04-2016, 09:30 PM
I just got my warn heavy-duty winching accessory kit from Warn yesterday instead of the white/grey glove i got the new black ones :thumb: . They had a mail in rebate with purchase of warn winch :thumb:

just need to get a winch damper and recovery strap.

time to practice with the items to familiarize myself with them.

Save some money on winch damper and use a towel, coat, floor mat, etc.

Nick Zambo
08-04-2016, 09:37 PM
Moving blankets work well also. It serves as a multi use item winch damper also lay on why doing trail fixes. It is especially good while laying on your back in the winter fixing your jeep. And the best part is they are cheap! That's my two cents.

Tincup
08-10-2016, 03:16 PM
Save some money on winch damper and use a towel, coat, floor mat, etc.


Moving blankets work well also. It serves as a multi use item winch damper also lay on why doing trail fixes. It is especially good while laying on your back in the winter fixing your jeep. And the best part is they are cheap! That's my two cents.

Thanks guys for the tip on alternatives to a winch damper. [emoji106]

aTX427
11-24-2017, 02:58 AM
I am looking to refresh my recovery gear and ARB has always been a top provider, but how do they stack up to some alternatives like Mac's or Bubba? I am always in the hunt for shaving weight and have seen some aluminum snatch blocks and soft shackles on the market.

wayoflife
11-24-2017, 04:49 PM
I am looking to refresh my recovery gear and ARB has always been a top provider, but how do they stack up to some alternatives like Mac's or Bubba? I am always in the hunt for shaving weight and have seen some aluminum snatch blocks and soft shackles on the market.

Unless you've got money burning a hole in your wallet, I don't know why you'd want to refresh what you have especially being that you trust ARB to be a "top provider" of recovery gear.

aTX427
11-25-2017, 02:16 AM
I don't have ARB now. It's old hodgepodge of gear that is pushing 10 years old with numerous pulls on them. If ARB is still tops, then that's great, because it's what I had my eyes on.

wayoflife
11-25-2017, 02:59 AM
I don't have ARB now. It's old hodgepodge of gear that is pushing 10 years old with numerous pulls on them. If ARB is still tops, then that's great, because it's what I had my eyes on.

Oh, okay. Mac's and Bubba both make quality gear. I've been using ARB for the last 20 years and they're still getting the job done well for me.

aTX427
11-25-2017, 04:41 AM
Great to hear. :beer: