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View Full Version : TRAIL FIX TIP: Replacing a Damaged Valve Stem



wayoflife
12-21-2012, 04:22 PM
If you have a 2008 or newer Jeep, your wheels will have come with TPMS or, valve stems that have a Tire Pressure Monitoring System. These sensors provide your Jeep's computer with real-time tire-pressure information and will alert you if one or more tires are running low on air. Unfortunately, TPMS valve stems are made out of ridgid aluminum and can be easily damaged on the trail. Once damaged, they can leak air or, prevent you from airing back up at the end of the day. Either way, a damaged TPMS will relegate your otherwise good tire unusable and force you to run your spare. Of course, that is only if you can't replace it and this Trail Fix Tip of the Day will help you to do just that.

What you will need
12mm Deep Socket
Ratchet
Valve Stem Installation Tool
Snap-in Replacement Valve Stem with a .453" Rim Hole
Hi-Lift Jack
Air Compressor
Another Jeep with Rocker Guards

Here is a shot of what at TPMS valve stem looks like after taking a hit on the trail.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214590[/IMG][/IMG]

This is a shot of what the replacement valve stems you'll need look like as well as the tool required to install them. The tool can be purchased from Off Road Evolution.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=324889

What you will need to do
1. Using a lug wrench or 19mm socket, crack the lug nuts loose on the wheel you need to repair. Use a jack to raise your Jeep from the base of your axle's differential or control arm joint and proceed to remove the wheel.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214578

http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214584

2. Place your tire under the rocker guard of another Jeep making sure that the sidewall and vavle stem are directly under it. Then, place the base of your Hi-Lift jack on the side wall and begin lifting the Jeep from the rocker guard as shown. This step will not actually raise your Jeep but rather, will break the bead of the tire.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214602

3. Use a deep 12mm socket to remove the TPMS retaining nut.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214606

4. With the retaining nut removed, you should be able to simply pull out the TPMS sensor.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214610

5. Insert the valve stem installation tool through the valve hole in valve hole in your wheel.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214614

6. Affix your new replacement valve stem onto the installation tool as shown.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214618

7. Carefully pull the new valve stem through the hole in your wheel until it pops in place. Being that you're just using a standard valve stem, no retaining nut will need to be installed.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214620

8. Lower and remove your Hi-lift jack. Pull up on the tire a bit so that the bead sits over the valve stem and then use an air compressor to reinflate your tire. It may be necessary to apply some soapy water or WD40 to the edge of the bead to help it pop back into place. Once it pops, continue airing up until you reach your desired air pressure.
http://project-jk.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=214626

9. Reinstall your wheel, tighten your lug nuts to 95 ft. lbs. of torque, lower your Jeep back on the ground and you should be good to go.

Be advised that your TPMS light will come on your dash but, it's really isn't anything to be worried about. Once you get home, you can have a replacement TPMS sensor installed or, get an AEV Procal, Superchips Flashpaq or other programmer to turn off the indicator light. :cool:

Skid_Kid
12-21-2012, 04:34 PM
Nice write up. Adding that to the list of recovery stuff I need to buy! Thanks Eddie!

gtony12
12-21-2012, 04:38 PM
Great write up, Have to say with all the write ups Eddie does here, we will all be pro's out on the trail's

Thank's Eddie!!

Flat Top
12-21-2012, 05:07 PM
Adding that to the list of recovery stuff I need to buy! Thanks Eddie!

+1 :thumb:

TwtPunk08JK
12-21-2012, 05:20 PM
Great write up!! Wish I would've known this about two years ago. Still knowledge is power and now I can help someone in the future.

OverlanderJK
12-21-2012, 07:16 PM
Good write up. I have had to do this before but it was defiantly not as easy without proper tools. :cheesy:

JHP81
12-22-2012, 01:10 AM
is it easy to set the bead with onboard air compressor?

wayoflife
12-22-2012, 01:51 AM
is it easy to set the bead with onboard air compressor?

Depends on the compressor. So long as its a pretty decent one, sure, no problem.

RockIt Man
12-22-2012, 04:30 AM
Eddie, are you still using the TPMS sensors on Moby or RubiCat? Afte reading this I am thinking that the standard rubber stems seem more reliable. I do have spyderlocks tho so the chance of damaging the stem is pretty low. I also own a procal module to turn off the alarm.

What's your opinion.

wayoflife
12-22-2012, 04:01 PM
Eddie, are you still using the TPMS sensors on Moby or RubiCat? Afte reading this I am thinking that the standard rubber stems seem more reliable. I do have spyderlocks tho so the chance of damaging the stem is pretty low. I also own a procal module to turn off the alarm.

What's your opinion.

Moby never came with TPMS and we yanked the ones in Rubicat as soon as we got new tires. They're totally unnecessary to have but, being that you have Spyderlocks, you're probably fine leaving them in.

Gibbo
01-04-2013, 08:38 AM
Great write up, Have to say with all the write ups Eddie does here, we will all be pro's out on the trail's

Thank's Eddie!!
Ditto, I need a new tool and a couple of valve stems for the kit now. Even I can remember how to do that.

donyuma
08-30-2013, 05:46 PM
I find it interesting how many things have been addressed on the forums, every question or problem so far I have been able to get an answer or at least a direction to go. Thanks Eddie and everyone else.:)

Txjkjpr
06-28-2015, 05:39 PM
Great write up, thanks. Now to go and buy more stuff for my "Just in Case" kit.

hogtyed
06-28-2015, 09:08 PM
Thanks for the great write-up. I think i'm gonna have to get a bigger trail bag. :broke:

Petthefish
06-29-2015, 06:19 AM
Awesome write up I wondered if it was possible to do on the trail. Anyone ever done it when they were out alone. I guess you could break the bead some other way.

wayoflife
06-29-2015, 02:12 PM
Awesome write up I wondered if it was possible to do on the trail. Anyone ever done it when they were out alone. I guess you could break the bead some other way.

If you have a Hi-Lift handy and a place on your Jeep where you can work off of, you can do this on your own. If you don't, I have been able to break the bead enough to work on the TPMS by driving on top of the sidewall. Of course, it'll only work on tires with thinner sidewalls and you'd have to swap in your spare first to do it.

jnabird333
06-29-2015, 02:27 PM
If you have a Hi-Lift handy and a place on your Jeep where you can work off of, you can do this on your own. If you don't, I have been able to break the bead enough to work on the TPMS by driving on top of the sidewall. Of course, it'll only work on tires with thinner sidewalls and you'd have to swap in your spare first to do it.

This is what I've done when someone I was wheeling with didn't have a spare. I think I would just plan to swap in my spare on the trail and then, (heaven forbid) another tire is needed, decide which of the two is an easier trail repair.

I like the cable stem puller. I have a swivel rod type. It works okay, but can be a bear to keep a grip on with muddy hands :yup:

MotoMatthew
06-29-2015, 02:57 PM
Good write up. Thanks. Actually had this happen to me this past weekend!

Edit: when I got home I removed the tpms from the valve stems and just banded the tpms inside the middle of the wheel. They are no longer attached to my valve stems so everything is really flexible.