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Renagade119
03-04-2013, 04:09 PM
I was talking to my dad the other day about water crossings and he told me to be uber careful about your speed and gear choice when driving a manual tranny cause once your gearbox and clutch is in water you can't shift because once you step on the clutch water rushes in and completely destroys your clutch. Is this true? Keep in mind he had a run in with this happening when a friend of my dads had to rebuild his Rangers clutch after he went swamping (why he went swamping in a Ranger I have no idea). Can anyone help me out?

combolc
03-07-2013, 04:18 PM
I was talking to my dad the other day about water crossings and he told me to be uber careful about your speed and gear choice when driving a manual tranny cause once your gearbox and clutch is in water you can't shift because once you step on the clutch water rushes in and completely destroys your clutch. Is this true? Keep in mind he had a run in with this happening when a friend of my dads had to rebuild his Rangers clutch after he went swamping (why he went swamping in a Ranger I have no idea). Can anyone help me out?

Bump.I would like some details o this as well.. I have heard this before but without facts.

wayoflife
03-07-2013, 04:24 PM
Yeah, that is the rule with a manual. Pick a good gear and go slow and steady. You do not want to shift once you're in the deep stuff.

jhires
03-07-2013, 04:31 PM
I was talking to my dad the other day about water crossings and he told me to be uber careful about your speed and gear choice when driving a manual tranny cause once your gearbox and clutch is in water you can't shift because once you step on the clutch water rushes in and completely destroys your clutch. Is this true? Keep in mind he had a run in with this happening when a friend of my dads had to rebuild his Rangers clutch after he went swamping (why he went swamping in a Ranger I have no idea). Can anyone help me out?

I think a lot of this "depends".
Your clutch plate is made from the same material as your brakes. Brakes get wet all the time without failing.
Most clutches are somewhat protected. Even the clutch fork should have a boot around it to prevent anything from getting in, however, on some older and/or modified vehicles, the inspection cover and boot are sometimes missing simply because they weren't put back on, or have fallen off.

If water does get in, if it has mud and sand in it, you can cause damage. Just plain fresh water should be of little consequence, however...
After a day out when a water crossing was involved, you should always inspect all of your fluids. Your Diffs, your transmission, your transfer case, and your engine oil should all be checked for water.

Oscar the Grouch
03-07-2013, 04:38 PM
another issue is your tranny breather is right on top next to the base of the shifter. too deep and its sunk too

Renagade119
03-07-2013, 04:43 PM
Gosh darnit. Whatever, I don't plan on doing water crossings in the TJ. I wanna getta JK

NatedTJ
03-08-2013, 01:34 AM
Wow good thing to know!!:)

Renagade119
03-08-2013, 03:22 AM
Yea no kidding. My father would have beaten me with a toaster oven has I called him and told him that I broke the clutch

RuffneckTwoZero
03-15-2013, 04:15 AM
New to the jeep life. I recently got stuck in a rut at a mud hole. I stepped in the clutch to keep from stalling within the water and to try and reverse out of the rut many times. I never let it stall and got pulled out by a Cherokee. Luckily I have no major consequence yet. I am new to manual and did not know these risks.

So basically it would be better to stall and get pulled out if you are in water and get stuck? I don't really enjoy mudding but Washington trails often have ponds and muddy areas to cross with high potential of getting stuck. Sometimes they're unavoidable.

19835

davantalus
03-17-2013, 08:10 AM
Haha. Great picture!

I once heard that you shouldn't change gears mid-river because this allows water to travel up your exhaust and possibly into the motor... Anyone want to call BS on that?

Pushrod
03-17-2013, 11:56 AM
As long as the engine is running water won't go up your exhaust due to the pressure within the pipe created by the engine exhaust pressure.

Renagade119
03-17-2013, 06:16 PM
I'm not sure here. I'm new to this area too. As for the water up the exhaust thing, as long as the engine is running you should be good

Radioman
04-03-2013, 02:45 AM
I call BS unless the water height is as high as the engine itself and the engine was not running.

81SocalCJ
04-03-2013, 03:16 AM
I'd call BS on the water getting into the motor as well, not while the engine is running. As far as shifting while in water/mud, I've got an '81 CJ7 with a T5 tranny. I've never had problems from shifting under water. I do have an extended breather tube for the tranny, and a rubber boot covering the clutch fork.

PssdffJay
04-03-2013, 04:26 AM
If you get stuck don't clutch. Stall it or shut it off. In 4 low you don't need the clutch to start the engine. You can put it in the gear, no clutch, and start it and you will start to move. Try this on dry ground first to see what that is like if you have never done this.

Steel Rain
04-03-2013, 04:59 AM
Here is the shiznit!!! As long as the motor is running your good provided the air intake is not submerged (the exhaust can be as long as the motor is running). If it stalls, manual or automatic, if the exhaust is under water and you try to start it, the compression will suck the water through the exhaust pipe and into the engine. Not good in any situation! I saw this happen once, the car would not start, so the plugs were pulled and once the car was turned over with no plugs in the cylinders water shot out of them over the roof of a house.:grayno: in other words: dont get froggy in the water because bad stuff can happen!!!!!:D

cottrellsahara
04-03-2013, 11:27 PM
If you get stuck don't clutch. Stall it or shut it off. In 4 low you don't need the clutch to start the engine. You can put it in the gear, no clutch, and start it and you will start to move. Try this on dry ground first to see what that is like if you have never done this.


When you start like this is it almost like the clutch is dumped and peel out? Im curious to try but and scared of ruining my clutch.

Skirmish
04-03-2013, 11:42 PM
It only works in 4L and I'm pretty sure only 1st and 2nd gear. At first the starter motor will be turning everything, then when the motor starts it will be at crawl speed. You don't need to touch the gas. It will be a slow movement. Don't do it on dry pavement though, 4L should be only used off road.

ctlazer5
04-04-2013, 12:02 AM
Just tried it. Who wuda known!? Works great. Good tip to know that I'm sure will come in handy.

Renagade119
06-10-2013, 03:12 PM
Where would I find this tranny breather tube? And how would I extend it? Also is there breather tubes for the axles?

mtnbiker995
06-10-2013, 04:30 PM
Where would I find this tranny breather tube? And how would I extend it? Also is there breather tubes for the axles?

Yes there are, and Eddie has a nice write up on relocating the rear breather after lifting your jeep. You can follow his process but just add a longer length of hose and run it somewhere dry. That's what I did!
34526
34527

Renagade119
06-10-2013, 04:32 PM
Awesome thanks. And for the rubber boot for the clutch, did jeeps come standard with those or do I have to buy one aftermarket?

mtnbiker995
06-11-2013, 04:21 PM
Awesome thanks. And for the rubber boot for the clutch, did jeeps come standard with those or do I have to buy one aftermarket?

Hmm that I'm not sure of. I wanna say yes, but I'm not positive.

Renagade119
06-11-2013, 04:27 PM
Hmm that I'm not sure of. I wanna say yes, but I'm not positive.

I'll look into it. Thanks

tbones999
06-12-2013, 05:04 PM
If you get stuck don't clutch. Stall it or shut it off. In 4 low you don't need the clutch to start the engine. You can put it in the gear, no clutch, and start it and you will start to move. Try this on dry ground first to see what that is like if you have never done this.

A little off topic, but this got me home the other day.

I am at a stop light, construction zone = heavy traffic, in my 1980 CJ7. I hear a Pop followed by a Clang. The adjustable bar in the clutch linkage failed (pop), then the clutch pedal fell to the floor (clang). I have the Jeep in neutral and now the clutch is permanently engaged. (Thinking about it now, if I was in first the Jeep probably would've lunged forward possibly hitting the person in front of me if it didn't stall. whew) So now the engine is running and I have no way to disengage the clutch to get it in gear.

I had my 18 month old in the back. I am a little self conscious about taking him for rides in it, but he loves it. (I taught him "what does a Jeep say?" when we taught him animal sounds. He knows lion, dog, cat, sheep, elephant, bird, and Jeep. The Jeep is a Tim Allen-esque grunt.) He always points to it and grunts when he sees it. In fact, I am not allowed to park in front of the house because he just constantly points out our window and grunts. :) I never go far or fast when he is in the Jeep, he is in his car seat, and I replaced the seat belts that hold his seat in, so I figure a quick ride to the park can't hurt. Back to the story, I definitely didn't want to pull my 18 month old out of my old Jeep on this busy highway when the tow truck arrives.

I remembered reading the "start your Jeep in 4L" trick when I was first researching buying my CJ. (Not supposed to run 4-wheel on dry pavement, but my front hubs were un-locked and I needed to get home.) So, I turn off the Jeep and push the transfer case into 4L. (Went right in, normally I have to just barely let the clutch out to get it to engage. Definitely a guardian angel.) When the light turned green I turned the key, and sure enough, the Jeep hopped forward, fired up, and we were crawling along. With the adrenaline flowing, I stepped on the gas pedal a bit too hard, squeaked the tires, and then let off. The old leaf springs made that a fun experience. The light turned Red and I shut the Jeep off. "Grunt grunt" from the back seat, and I burst out laughing. I asked the person next to me if I could cut in front of him because my Jeep had broke and I needed to get off the hwy. We crawled home (about 12 blocks).

Not only will that tip get you out of a mud hole and help you when crawling, but you can get your Jeep to move when your clutch linkage breaks!

firecrew1
06-12-2013, 10:03 PM
A little off topic, but this got me home the other day.

I am at a stop light, construction zone = heavy traffic, in my 1980 CJ7. I hear a Pop followed by a Clang. The adjustable bar in the clutch linkage failed (pop), then the clutch pedal fell to the floor (clang). I have the Jeep in neutral and now the clutch is permanently engaged. (Thinking about it now, if I was in first the Jeep probably would've lunged forward possibly hitting the person in front of me if it didn't stall. whew) So now the engine is running and I have no way to disengage the clutch to get it in gear.

I had my 18 month old in the back. I am a little self conscious about taking him for rides in it, but he loves it. (I taught him "what does a Jeep say?" when we taught him animal sounds. He knows lion, dog, cat, sheep, elephant, bird, and Jeep. The Jeep is a Tim Allen-esque grunt.) He always points to it and grunts when he sees it. In fact, I am not allowed to park in front of the house because he just constantly points out our window and grunts. :) I never go far or fast when he is in the Jeep, he is in his car seat, and I replaced the seat belts that hold his seat in, so I figure a quick ride to the park can't hurt. Back to the story, I definitely didn't want to pull my 18 month old out of my old Jeep on this busy highway when the tow truck arrives.

I remembered reading the "start your Jeep in 4L" trick when I was first researching buying my CJ. (Not supposed to run 4-wheel on dry pavement, but my front hubs were un-locked and I needed to get home.) So, I turn off the Jeep and push the transfer case into 4L. (Went right in, normally I have to just barely let the clutch out to get it to engage. Definitely a guardian angel.) When the light turned green I turned the key, and sure enough, the Jeep hopped forward, fired up, and we were crawling along. With the adrenaline flowing, I stepped on the gas pedal a bit too hard, squeaked the tires, and then let off. The old leaf springs made that a fun experience. The light turned Red and I shut the Jeep off. "Grunt grunt" from the back seat, and I burst out laughing. I asked the person next to me if I could cut in front of him because my Jeep had broke and I needed to get off the hwy. We crawled home (about 12 blocks).

Not only will that tip get you out of a mud hole and help you when crawling, but you can get your Jeep to move when your clutch linkage breaks!
Thats to bad about the linkage, but thats awesome that you have a future jeeper in your household:thumb:

fredfunk
06-20-2013, 07:50 PM
Hmm... I'm a little confused by conflicting information here...

So on the one hand, I should not engage the clutch when the fork is submerged, instead I should turn the engine off and put it in 1st gear (or reverse?) then restart the engine so as to avoid getting water/sand/mud in the clutch... But on the other hand, I should never start the engine when the muffler is submerged so as to avoid sucking up water into the exhaust due to compression and possibly hydrolocking the engine?!

jnabird333
06-20-2013, 08:08 PM
You should try to avoid clutching under water... If your in 4L, 1st/2nd it's not likely you will stall. If you do I would suggest being pulled/towed out and only restart once the tail-pipe is out of the water. In the few instances I have been around for this, I towed them out and we left the rig a little nose high on the bank to help any water drain out of the exhaust before restarting.

The 4L restart in gear is better used when climbing hills or crawling in my opinion than a water aid. Keep in mind in 4L you can shift without clutching. (I do it all the time) only had a grind once and it was cuz I was still in the gas too much.

All this said I try to avoid crossing water that covers the tires. (This is a good rule-of-thumb to keep the vents in air)

fredfunk
06-21-2013, 12:15 PM
thanks bird...
I have extended all my breathers and I've got a snorkel. I have started it up with the exhaust submerged with no problems but I will try to avoid it in the future. I have also punched the clutch when submerged with no problems. I have to do some major puddle jumping to get to some property I own off an unmaintained rd. Some of the puddles are 3' deep during the rainy season!