Page 25 of 30 FirstFirst ... 152324252627 ... LastLast
Results 241 to 250 of 291

Thread: Basic Do-it-Yourself Jeep JK Wrangler Front End Alignment

  1. #241
    Living the WAYALIFE JKbrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Leo, Indiana
    Posts
    10,100
    I think he replied to the wrong forum


    Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app

  2. #242
    Old Timer VeruGE*144's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Illinois, Chicago
    Posts
    3,664
    They come in threes..... One more to go.

  3. #243
    Been Around the Block Basscat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Durango, CO
    Posts
    429
    So I’ve read most of this thread and have a quick question. RE: Caster; Given 6 degrees of separation on a stock set up with 4.2 + being optimal and 10 degrees of separation on a PR44 Unlimited with 6.0 + being optimal does the inclusion of geometry correction brackets with the PR44 Unlimited result in taking optimum caster back to factory spec of 4.2 +?


    Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app

  4. #244
    Meme King WJCO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    The Matrix
    Posts
    32,226
    Quote Originally Posted by Basscat View Post
    So I’ve read most of this thread and have a quick question. RE: Caster; Given 6 degrees of separation on a stock set up with 4.2 + being optimal and 10 degrees of separation on a PR44 Unlimited with 6.0 + being optimal does the inclusion of geometry correction brackets with the PR44 Unlimited result in taking optimum caster back to factory spec of 4.2 +?


    Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app
    It could. But most likely it would increase the caster more that what the PR has. Some of the brackets have multiple holes for caster adjustment. If the arm is a fixed length, moving it directly down in a geometry correction bracket, will twist the axle increasing the caster. However if the bracket hole isn't directly under the OEM mount hole and it's further back to accommodate the length of the arm, the caster could stay the same. To the best of my knowledge, the bracket is more designed to bring the lower arms more parallel with the road rather than deal with caster.

    The difference of axle separation really isn't all that important if you just want to know what your caster angle is. Caster can still be measured on either axle whether you have brackets or not.
    “To secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”

    Jeep parts and accessories purchased through the following link will help support this forum and at no cost to you.
    RECOMMENDED JEEP PARTS & ACCESSORIES



    Support the JL forum: JLWRANGLER.COM

  5. #245
    Been Around the Block Basscat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Durango, CO
    Posts
    429
    Appreciate the quick input. Was thinking similarly. It’s an AEV correction bracket (part of a 3.5” lift) on a 2013 JKU I got for my son. Adjustable front uppers are included. Would prefer to take correction brackets out and go with 6+ caster on the PR44 Unlimited but was curious if I left the brackets in would I then need to target 4+ on caster.


    Sent from my iPad using WAYALIFE mobile app

  6. #246
    Fresh Catch
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2

    Front end align

    Awesome write up,just purchased a 2013 jeep kj sahara for 30k. Whole front end needed replaced. I followed each step as close to the letter as possible and it rolls like a champ. Thanks from a veteran.

  7. #247
    Been Around the Block PokerStogey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Bakersfield
    Posts
    498
    This right here...
    Just another reason WAL sits at the top, great info. Just finished the flip kit for the EVO stage 1 last night and will be reading this again. Thanks Eddie!!!


    Sent from my iPhone using WAYALIFE mobile app

  8. #248
    Fresh Catch AZchip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    10
    I know, old post. But I joined today to find this information. Great info! Thanks for putting that concise information on alignment. I just installed a Metalcloak 3.5 Gamechanger. This is going to help me. Thanks again.

  9. #249
    Fresh Catch
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    4

    Thank you so so much ! Awesome write up

    This has helped me a lot

  10. #250
    Fresh Catch
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1
    Best write up ever!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by wayoflife View Post
    Setting Your Toe-In
    Contrary to what you might think, your front wheels do not sit parallel to each other. In fact, if you were to look straight down on them, they would be sitting with the front of your tires pointing ever so slightly inward. This is called a "toe-in" and, on a rear wheel drive vehicle, it is set this way on purpose to help keep your Jeep driving straight and give your tires a more even wear.

    Unlike the TJ before, the steering system on a JK does not have the tie-rod connected to the drag link and therefore, the toe-in setting will not be effected with the installation of a lift. Needless to say, an adjustment to your toe will be required. Having said that, if you've installed a new tie-rod or bent your factory one on a rock, this write-up will help you to set it back to where it needs to be.

    1. Park on level ground and then with the help of a friend, measure the width between the fronts of your front tires and then compare it to the width of the back of your front tires. It is important to use the exact same measuring point front and back in order to get an accurate reading. If your tires still have a mold seam, this is a good point to measure from. Or, if you have a toe-in alignment tool (can be purchased at Harbor Freight for about $20), that will give you the most accurate measurements.


    2. Start up your engine, turn your wheels both ways fully and then straighten your steering wheel. Using a 15mm socket, loosen the nut securing the adjuster clamp on tie rod as shown in this pic.


    3. Firmly grab the tie-rod’s knurled adjuster and rotate it a little bit at a time taking measurements along the way. If you're Jeep sees a lot of water, mud or salt, you may find it necessary to spray down the threads with some penetrating oil and use a pair of vicegrips to help turn the adjuster. Ideally, you'll want to have approximately 1/16" of toe-in. You should not exceed 1/8" as anything more than that will be too much and that'll your tires to wear poorly.


    4. Once your toe-in has been set, use a 15mm socket to re-tighten the nut securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s tie-rod clamp. Tighten this nut to 45 ft. lbs. of torque and make sure that the tie-rod does not move while doing this.

Page 25 of 30 FirstFirst ... 152324252627 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
“wayoflife” is a moniker that I’ve been using for 20 years now and I chose it because I think it does a great job of explaining, in simple terms, the passion I have for Jeeps and the Jeep way of life. This is a lifestyle that transcends age, gender and race as the only thing you need to be a part of it is a love for the outdoors, a desire to explore, a yearning to take on a challenge and a will to conquer it. Over the years, Cindy and I have attempted to capture the essence of this lifestyle through photographs and videos and share it with others around the world. And, this is how WAYALIFE was born.
Join us
WATCH OUR VIDEOS