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Martinnfb

New member
Wow, that is so clean!

As a side note: I don't understand this style of dual or triple rated spring at all. Why would you want to run them when they are in effect, already partially bound? You may as well run spacers. Am I missing something?

View attachment 381449

Here’s a quick write up about progressive rate springs, basically the top sleeps dormant until you flex it. :)



* This was originally posted here
 
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OverlanderJK

Resident Smartass

Martinnfb

New member
It depends, they provide roll control, it is like to have extra sway bar in your suspension. By flexing I meant the axle movement during cornering.
 

OverlanderJK

Resident Smartass
What I thought. You're losing usable coils on the street with these springs
The only way they are not compressed is when the coil is fully unseated. If the suspension is setup correctly then the softer rate is never used. Not even when flexing. I’m sure you know this and I should have quoted the other dudes post but I didn’t. Lol
 

Ddays

Hooked
It depends, they provide roll control, it is like to have extra sway bar in your suspension. By flexing I meant the axle movement during cornering.

That's what sway bars are for. To some degree stiffer shocks & springs contribute but that's incidental. Disconnect your sway bar & you see directly what's going on. The definition of flexing here isnt cornering, it's how the axle articulates when offroad going over obstacles. Partially collapsed multi-rate springs cause you to lose usable spring length
 

Martinnfb

New member
The deflection is calculated in the length of the spring , dual rate spring prevent unnecessary binding and divide the load. Racers in the sand cars and UTV guys were using them for years, as a combination of two linear coils of different rate with a spacer in between, the idea is brilliant.
 
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Ddays

Hooked
The deflection is calculated in the length of the spring , dual rate spring prevent unnecessary binding and divide the load. Racers in the sand cars and UTV guys were using them for years, as a combination of two linear coils of different rate with a spacer in between, the idea is brilliant.
Sure, I can see that. But the upper section of these springs are collapsed. They're bound. There is no rate when springs are collapsed
 

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Martinnfb

New member
The only way they are not compressed is when the coil is fully unseated. If the suspension is setup correctly then the softer rate is never used. Not even when flexing. I’m sure you know this and I should have quoted the other dudes post but I didn’t. Lol
Can you elaborate, especially about the part of not using the softer rate ?
 

Irish JK

Caught the Bug
The deflection is calculated in the length of the spring , dual rate spring prevent unnecessary binding and divide the load. Racers in the sand cars and UTV guys were using them for years, as a combination of two linear coils of different rate with a spacer in between, the idea is brilliant.
Dual spring rates on coil overs are a whole different mechanism allowed for by the timing rings.

Progressive rate springs such as these are useless. Your example of an extension situation is further proof. In that case, you don’t want softer spring, you need the opposite to help either slow roll back if articulated or control a landing if fully extended.
 

bobfriesenhahn

Active Member
Sure, I can see that. But the upper section of these springs are collapsed. They're bound. There is no rate when springs are collapsed
Behavior would be different if the tire drives over a hole. Not so good if it goes over a hump. 😄

No doubt, a progressive spring is intended to still be in the softer portion while on level ground in order to produce a "softer" feel on level ground (like on the road, or at the shopping mall).

If the progressive part is already compressed then must be the wrong spring for the vehicle.
 

Martinnfb

New member
How you going to explain this. Pictures taken in 2014 Afghanistan, Czech MAXXPRO suspension with dual rate coils.

Explanation in this video
 

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bobfriesenhahn

Active Member
How you going to explain this. Pictures taken in 2014 Afghanistan, Czech MAXXPRO suspension with dual rate coils.

Explanation in this video
Mostly what I see in these photos are extra large bump-stops, showing that there is little suspension travel possible.

FYI, there are rules against linking to external content in this forum.
 

bobfriesenhahn

Active Member
Where is that rule posted ?
Please see the "Help" section, where many of the additional rules are posted. The rules do not appear to ban all linked content (direct posting/uploading of content is strongly preferred), but they do ban links to other forums, YouTube channels, and all activities by non-approved vendors.
 

Martinnfb

New member
Got it, thank you. If my post violated the rules, admins please remove it. Yet have a look at the video and the link I posted before, the intention is to educate, not to promote. Linear coils are the music of the past. In matter of fact I am dumping Mojave suspension in favour of variable setup.
 

Irish JK

Caught the Bug
Got it, thank you. If my post violated the rules, admins please remove it. Yet have a look at the video and the link I posted before, the intention is to educate, not to promote. Linear coils are the music of the past. In matter of fact I am dumping Mojave suspension in favour of variable setup.
Consider me dumber.
 
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