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View Full Version : Tips for choosing a line for a newb



FuriousDz
11-30-2012, 01:23 AM
Im new to wheelin on the rocks, did better the second time out then the first.

I was wondering if anyone would be willing to share some of the knowledge you use when choosing a line other than keep the big stuff under the tires and away from the middle.

I know there are many factors such as terrain, driving and rig capabilities and some i probably dont even realize. I was just hoping to get a little insight and maybe some tips you guys use, maybe some dos and donts.

Hope to hear from the experienced wheelers on here.

Thanks

wayoflife
11-30-2012, 01:26 AM
Great thread!! Do you have a manual or automatic? Also, do you have a Rubicon or Sport/X or Sahara?

FuriousDz
11-30-2012, 01:31 AM
6 speed unlimited sport
3.73's
3.5 rk
37" toyo mts

Im going to address the axles and gears right after the winter. I know that 30 pushing those big tires isnt going to last long

wayoflife
11-30-2012, 01:44 AM
6 speed unlimited sport
3.73's
3.5 rk
37" toyo mts

Im going to address the axles and gears right after the winter. I know that 30 pushing those big tires isnt going to last long

Well, when you upgrade your axles, I would definitely regear at the same time. Pushing 37's with a 6-speed, 3.73 gears and a 2.72:1 transfer case isn't exactly going to help you on the rocks. If you can afford to buy a used Rubicon t-case, that'll help out a lot too.

Having said that, keeping your tires on the big stuff and everything else out from under your Jeep is good advice. Being that you have a stick, try to keep it in 1st gear and low range and and try to stay off the clutch. If needed, use your hand brake to help control your speed/movement when starting off on a big climb - engage your hand brake, start to let up on your clutch and when you feel it starting to pull forward, slowly let off on the hand brake and apply gas all at the same time. It takes some practice but, it'll help out a lot and help keep you from burning out your clutch. Throttle control is a big part of wheeling and if you can learn how to do that well in a manual, you'll be golden.

As far as picking good lines go, try to always plan a route 2-3 steps ahead of what's immediately in front of you. If needed, get out and walk the trail a bit and try to memorize where you want to be next. As you're working your way through the obstacle, try to remember what you want to be doing next and you come up and over each rock, tree or what have you. If you get to a point where you've forgotten what to do next or, aren't where you thought you'd be, stop, get out and re-asses things. If you have a spotter, tell them what you're hoping to do before you start as good communication goes a long way.

Aside from that, make sure you're airing down enough as that will help give you better traction and of course, make sure that you disconnect your front sway bar to help give you better articulation.

FuriousDz
11-30-2012, 01:58 AM
Thanks for the great advice. I will keep it all in mind next time im out on the trail.

Im definitely going to address the gears and add lockers when I do the axles.

Im already finding the importance of gears and throttle control as my rig wants to stall out a lot while crawling. The e-brake will be a big help as it gets a little sketchy trying to slip the clutch when starting over something or even scarier going down a steep hill. Finding that balance of just enough gas, clutch and brake is fun, fortunately for me most of the behicles Ihave ever owned have been manuals so I can drive one pretty well.

What about knowing which direction to turn your wheels when leaning one way or the other? I would imagin it could be the difference in getting over and rolling over. Any rules of thumb when off camber?

wayoflife
11-30-2012, 02:01 AM
What about knowing which direction to turn your wheels when leaning one way or the other? I would imagin it could be the difference in getting over and rolling over.

Rule of thumb is to turn into the fall just like you would turn into a slide.


Any rules of thumb when off camber?

Suck in the cushions and pray - LOL!! Just kidding. More times than not, you're probably not leaning as far as you think and in situations like that, having a spotter telling you what the reality is can be very helpful.

FuriousDz
11-30-2012, 02:03 AM
Rule of thumb is to turn into the fall just like you would turn into a slide.

Thats what I thought, thanks a bunch!

Hopefully one day Ill make it out to the left coast to wheel with you guys

1BAMFR
11-30-2012, 02:39 AM
I agree w/ above stated about swapping out your transfer case for a new/used Rubi 4:1 TC....its seriously night and day.....for rocks you need it with a 6 speed tranny.

Automatic guys can get away with it but the 6 spds. Will either stall out or go too fast for "crawling"

FuriousDz
11-30-2012, 02:50 AM
Thanks, id like to put an atlas in at some point but thats some serious $$

1BAMFR
11-30-2012, 10:35 AM
Thanks, id like to put an atlas in at some point but thats some serious $$

I thought about doing one of those as well, but the Rubi TC is a direct bolt in replacement. Bought mine out of a wrecked JKR for $850.

FuriousDz
11-30-2012, 11:39 AM
I thought about doing one of those as well, but the Rubi TC is a direct bolt in replacement. Bought mine out of a wrecked JKR for $850.

Ill have to keep an eye out for one then

WOH111
12-05-2012, 09:00 AM
Might sound funny but it true, drive by the seat of your pants. Your backside will feel things your hands on wheel won't or feet on the floor won't either. Were you can feel the slightest movement no matter which direction, with your bottom. And if is telling you don't go that direction, pay attention to your feelings.

FuriousDz
12-07-2012, 08:29 PM
So far...

keep the big stuff out from the middle
gearing is important
turn into a fall
and
listen to your rear end

Anyone else want to share their expertise and thoughts they use when choosing a line?

jeep-creep
12-08-2012, 08:45 PM
Watch a lot of rock crawling vids. Like watching film for football of fighters... We are all, always learning. You are well on your way, you weren't too proud to ask for help.
Cheers! ;))

FuriousDz
12-08-2012, 10:08 PM
Watch a lot of rock crawling vids. Like watching film for football of fighters... We are all, always learning. You are well on your way, you weren't too proud to ask for help.
Cheers! ;))

Thanks, i always try to read up and watch as much as i can before I start asking questions but there is no substitution for real world experience. I was always taught the only stupid questions are the ones not asked. Thanks again for the reply.

wayoflife
12-08-2012, 10:31 PM
Thanks, i always try to read up and watch as much as i can before I start asking questions but there is no substitution for real world experience. I was always taught the only stupid questions are the ones not asked. Thanks again for the reply.

If you can, try wheeling with people who are a lot more experienced than you. They can teach you a lot and hands on. :)

Sharkey
12-08-2012, 11:30 PM
You need to learn where your tires are and that comes from driving offroad, a lot. Practice seeing how close you can get each tire to an obstacle before touching the obstacle; test how accurate you are at determining how far apart your tires are, both side to side and front to back. Having a feel for where your tires are at all times is huge in my book.

FuriousDz
12-08-2012, 11:54 PM
If you can, try wheeling with people who are a lot more experienced than you. They can teach you a lot and hands on. :)

This is exactly what ive been trying to do. I just usually wind up feeling bad cause i dont want to hold anyone up being less experienced.

I have to say though the couple times ive been out, the guys ive tagged along with have been great with showing me things.

FuriousDz
12-09-2012, 12:01 AM
You need to learn where your tires are and that comes from driving offroad, a lot. Practice seeing how close you can get each tire to an obstacle before touching the obstacle; test how accurate you are at determining how far apart your tires are, both side to side and front to back. Having a feel for where your tires are at all times is huge in my book.

Funny you say that as this is the very thing ive been trying to get better at.

In a regular car im used to the edge of the tires being even with the edges of the hood/body.

Where as now its easy to forget your flares stick out a decent amount past the body. Also having 13.50 wide tires with 1.5 spacers puts them out even further. So i actually got out of the jeep and saw that my tires line up fairly well with the side view mirrors so i try to visualize that being my centerline for my tires.

wayoflife
12-09-2012, 03:31 PM
This is exactly what ive been trying to do. I just usually wind up feeling bad cause i dont want to hold anyone up being less experienced.

I have to say though the couple times ive been out, the guys ive tagged along with have been great with showing me things.

Most guys will be more than happy to help you out and if they aren't, you don't want to be wheeling with them anyway.

Serg5000
12-09-2012, 04:07 PM
Being new to wheelin was the most frustrating part. I was fortunate to hook up with one of the guys I work with that has wheeled for many years. He has shown me many things. Now I spot for others. I found that most are willing to help the new guys. Just be patient and don't get frustrated when on the trail.
You pick things up quick.

Holeshot
12-09-2012, 05:30 PM
The biggest hint I can tell you is, when you're not sure of what's going on, or if you're not at ease with an obstacle for particular reasons, whatever it may be, from to steep angles, off camber situations, etc. JUST ask your partner/spotter to go out and look from the exterior and guide you through. Like WOL said, things often seems worst than they really are.

FuriousDz
12-09-2012, 06:12 PM
Thanks everyone I really appreciate all the advice.

If I could Id be out wheelin everyday. Buying a jeep is truly one of the best things i ever did. Its the only vehicle ive ever owned that makes me happy to just be in it on and off road ALL the time.

piginajeep
12-09-2012, 07:15 PM
What year is your JK?

FuriousDz
12-09-2012, 07:55 PM
What year is your JK?

Its a 2011 so i have the hamster on the wheel :)

piginajeep
12-09-2012, 08:39 PM
Its a 2011 so i have the hamster on the wheel :)

Just curious if you have the new brake assist for the 6 speed. I have it on my 2012. It's very helpful for rockcrawling once you master it.

I don't know of the 2011 has it or not

FuriousDz
12-09-2012, 09:02 PM
Just curious if you have the new brake assist for the 6 speed. I have it on my 2012. It's very helpful for rockcrawling once you master it.

I don't know of the 2011 has it or not

Yes, i do have it on the 11 and that and using the hand brake has definitely helped

piginajeep
12-09-2012, 09:36 PM
Yes, i do have it on the 11 and that and using the hand brake has definitely helped

You don't really need to use the hand brake on climbing. Push the brake down hard and let go. It will hold the brake for 4-5 seconds while you work the clutch.

Or go lighter for less brake pressure

FuriousDz
12-09-2012, 09:42 PM
You don't really need to use the hand brake on climbing. Push the brake down hard and let go. It will hold the brake for 4-5 seconds while you work the clutch.

Or go lighter for less brake pressure

Cool, thanks for the tip

M_Savage
12-03-2014, 07:34 PM
Don't have any advice but i just want to say thank you for starting this as i am a new guy too! have owned a my jeep now for a year but haven't had a chance to do anything more than light offroading and campus. so it is good to start learning this stuff now before i attempt any of it.

KingCopperhead
12-03-2014, 08:38 PM
Have a spotter that you trust. Learn the terminology and hand signals that he or she may use to guide you over a tight spot.

Instead of using "right and left" use "passenger or driver" keeps ya from getting mixed up. Seems like common sense but still, never know.

Your spotter is essentially your eyes, really need to be able to communicate and trust them.

I'm still learning too, similar setup rig as yours. Regear asap. I've been out twice with 3.73s and 35s and it sucks in rocks. Just geared to 4.88 but haven't been able to test it out yet.

Learn how to estimate where your undercarriage parts are too especially your pumpkins, be mindful of where they are so you don't get hung up on them.

Don't be afraid to back off and try something again later. The folks I wheel with told me this on day 1. Nobody is gonna make fun of you, fixing a broken rig or contending with an injury is far worse than a little broken pride.

This is all stuff I've been told and learned on my first few tips out in the rocks. I'm still a novice myself but figured I'd pass along what little I know. Also, practice the hand brake technique. Eddie told me about it before my last trip and it helped me a lot in a few spots.

Davwashere
12-03-2014, 10:44 PM
I've learned most of my knowledge by watching the lines people take in front of me. Especially the bad lines!!! Give yourself enough space in between you and the rig ahead of you so you can see all the rocks they just went over.

el_chupo_
12-03-2014, 11:45 PM
As a noob, thanks to the OP for posting, and all the responses, and to whomever brought this back up!

thardy
12-04-2014, 12:32 AM
Yes, thank you for bumping this to the top. It's always good to hear the advice of the people with more experience. Looking forward to getting out some soon with some more experienced folks. The one thing that I've learned in the year that I've had the Jeep is that I like to get out and watch someone else go through the obstacle before I do, especially if I have any amount of hesitation. Watching the lines, suspension, and undercarriage gives me a good idea of how my Jeep will react.

dannymalkin
12-04-2014, 12:40 AM
Great thread 👍

ttfhell
12-04-2014, 12:47 AM
When in doubt, throttle out 👍👍

OverlanderJK
12-04-2014, 12:51 AM
When in doubt, throttle out 👍👍

Words to live by.

piginajeep
12-04-2014, 12:53 AM
When in doubt, throttle out 👍👍

I tried that once ..

OverlanderJK
12-04-2014, 01:12 AM
I tried that once ..

Lol. Too bad the videographer ran away.

Strike Force Zebra
12-04-2014, 01:49 AM
Lol. Too bad the videographer ran away.

Ran away, or turned away?

Climbs an descents take a little more thought too. A quick tap on the gas if you are really feeling the rear end raise up can keep you from going over. Going up, and feeling it come over.... Off the the gas and into reverse will hopefully help.

Speeddmn
12-04-2014, 02:31 AM
Didnt see this offered, but dont be afraid of stacking a couple rocks to help out, little bit of muscle is better then breaking something. Just because someone on 40's can clear it dosent mean a guy on 35's will. Afterwards remove the rocks.

Meade93
12-04-2014, 04:43 AM
Didnt see this offered, but dont be afraid of stacking a couple rocks to help out, little bit of muscle is better then breaking something. Just because someone on 40's can clear it dosent mean a guy on 35's will. Afterwards remove the rocks.

And if you do this be very careful because even though you may think its a big rock your jeep can throw it out like nothing.

zombjep
12-04-2014, 05:24 AM
I tried that once ..

:eek: Yeah..that was a bad moment in Jeep video.